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Title: Charge radii in macroscopic-microscopic mass models

Abstract

We show that the FRLDM model currently being used in macroscopic-microscopic fission-barrier calculations gives a rather poor agreement with measured charge radii. Considerable improvement in this respect can be made by adjusting the diffuseness parameter b.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Physics Department, McGill University, Ernest Rutherford Building, 3600 University St., Montreal, Quebec, H3A 2T8 (Canada)
  2. Dept. de Physique, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, H3C 3J7 (Canada)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20699149
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review. C, Nuclear Physics; Journal Volume: 72; Journal Issue: 5; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevC.72.057305; (c) 2005 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
73 NUCLEAR PHYSICS AND RADIATION PHYSICS; CALCULATION METHODS; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; FISSION BARRIER; MASS; NUCLEAR MODELS; NUCLEAR RADII

Citation Formats

Buchinger, F., and Pearson, J.M. Charge radii in macroscopic-microscopic mass models. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.1103/PhysRevC.72.057305.
Buchinger, F., & Pearson, J.M. Charge radii in macroscopic-microscopic mass models. United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevC.72.057305.
Buchinger, F., and Pearson, J.M. Tue . "Charge radii in macroscopic-microscopic mass models". United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevC.72.057305.
@article{osti_20699149,
title = {Charge radii in macroscopic-microscopic mass models},
author = {Buchinger, F. and Pearson, J.M.},
abstractNote = {We show that the FRLDM model currently being used in macroscopic-microscopic fission-barrier calculations gives a rather poor agreement with measured charge radii. Considerable improvement in this respect can be made by adjusting the diffuseness parameter b.},
doi = {10.1103/PhysRevC.72.057305},
journal = {Physical Review. C, Nuclear Physics},
number = 5,
volume = 72,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Nov 01 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Tue Nov 01 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}
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