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Title: Imaging three dimensional two-particle correlations for heavy-ion reaction studies

Abstract

We report an extension of the source imaging method for analyzing three-dimensional sources from three-dimensional correlations. Our technique consists of expanding the correlation data and the underlying source function in spherical harmonics and inverting the resulting system of one-dimensional integral equations. With this strategy, we can image the source function quickly, even with the finely binned data sets common in three-dimensional analyses.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)
  2. (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20699138
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review. C, Nuclear Physics; Journal Volume: 72; Journal Issue: 5; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevC.72.054902; (c) 2005 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
73 NUCLEAR PHYSICS AND RADIATION PHYSICS; CORRELATIONS; HEAVY ION REACTIONS; IMAGES; INTEGRAL EQUATIONS; ONE-DIMENSIONAL CALCULATIONS; SPHERICAL HARMONICS; THREE-DIMENSIONAL CALCULATIONS

Citation Formats

Brown, D.A., Enokizono, A., Heffner, M., Soltz, R., Danielewicz, P., Pratt, S., and Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824. Imaging three dimensional two-particle correlations for heavy-ion reaction studies. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.1103/PhysRevC.72.054902.
Brown, D.A., Enokizono, A., Heffner, M., Soltz, R., Danielewicz, P., Pratt, S., & Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824. Imaging three dimensional two-particle correlations for heavy-ion reaction studies. United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevC.72.054902.
Brown, D.A., Enokizono, A., Heffner, M., Soltz, R., Danielewicz, P., Pratt, S., and Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824. Tue . "Imaging three dimensional two-particle correlations for heavy-ion reaction studies". United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevC.72.054902.
@article{osti_20699138,
title = {Imaging three dimensional two-particle correlations for heavy-ion reaction studies},
author = {Brown, D.A. and Enokizono, A. and Heffner, M. and Soltz, R. and Danielewicz, P. and Pratt, S. and Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824},
abstractNote = {We report an extension of the source imaging method for analyzing three-dimensional sources from three-dimensional correlations. Our technique consists of expanding the correlation data and the underlying source function in spherical harmonics and inverting the resulting system of one-dimensional integral equations. With this strategy, we can image the source function quickly, even with the finely binned data sets common in three-dimensional analyses.},
doi = {10.1103/PhysRevC.72.054902},
journal = {Physical Review. C, Nuclear Physics},
number = 5,
volume = 72,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Nov 01 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Tue Nov 01 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}
  • The authors report an extension of the source imaging method for analyzing three-dimensional sources from three-dimensional correlations. The technique consists of expanding the correlation data and the underlying source function in spherical harmonics and inverting the resulting system of one-dimensional integral equations. With this strategy, they can image the source function quickly, even with the extremely large data sets common in three-dimensional analyses.
  • We present a realistic expanding source model with nine parameters that are necessary and sufficient to describe the main physics occurring during hydrodynamical freeze-out of the excited hadronic matter produced in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. As a first test of the model, we compare it to data from central Si + Au collisions at {ital p}{sub lab}/{ital A}=14.6 GeV/{ital c} measured in experiment E-802 at the Brookhaven Alternating Gradient Synchrotron. An overall {chi}{sup 2} per degree of freedom of 1.055 is achieved for a fit to 1416 data points involving invariant {pi}{sup +}, {pi}{sup {minus}}, {ital K}{sup +}, and {ital K}{supmore » {minus}} one-particle multiplicity distributions and {pi}{sup +} and {ital K}{sup +} two-particle correlations. The 99{percent}-confidence region of parameter space is identified, leading to one-dimensional error estimates on the nine fitted parameters and other calculated physical quantities. Three of the most important results are the freeze-out temperature, longitudinal proper time, and baryon density along the symmetry axis. For these we find values of 92.9 {plus_minus} 4.4 MeV, 8.2 {plus_minus} 2.2 fm/{ital c}, and 0.0222{sub {minus}0.0069}{sup +0.0096} fm{sup {minus}3}, respectively. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}« less
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