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Title: Restoring a sludge holding tank at a wastewater treatment plant using high-performance coatings

Abstract

Faced with a serious hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) corrosion problem in two sludge holding tanks in 1993, the city of Concord, New Hampshire, repaired the deteriorating substrate by using a conventional acrylic-modified cementitious resurfacer and a coal tar epoxy (CTE) coating system. CTE failure occurred within 2 years, leading to more severe coating delamination. Restoration was delayed for 10 years, which caused extensive chemical attack on the concrete substrate-upwards of 2 in. (50 mm) of concrete loss. This article explains how one of these tanks was restored and prepared for another 15+ years of service.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Tnemec Co. Inc., Kansas City, MO (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20688455
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Materials Performance; Journal Volume: 44; Journal Issue: 11
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; TANKS; SLUDGES; WATER TREATMENT PLANTS; WASTE WATER; HYDROGEN SULFIDES; CORROSIVE EFFECTS; COAL TAR; EXPLOSIVES; PROTECTIVE COATINGS; FAILURES; CONCRETES; SERVICE LIFE

Citation Formats

O'Dea, V. Restoring a sludge holding tank at a wastewater treatment plant using high-performance coatings. United States: N. p., 2005. Web.
O'Dea, V. Restoring a sludge holding tank at a wastewater treatment plant using high-performance coatings. United States.
O'Dea, V. Tue . "Restoring a sludge holding tank at a wastewater treatment plant using high-performance coatings". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_20688455,
title = {Restoring a sludge holding tank at a wastewater treatment plant using high-performance coatings},
author = {O'Dea, V.},
abstractNote = {Faced with a serious hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) corrosion problem in two sludge holding tanks in 1993, the city of Concord, New Hampshire, repaired the deteriorating substrate by using a conventional acrylic-modified cementitious resurfacer and a coal tar epoxy (CTE) coating system. CTE failure occurred within 2 years, leading to more severe coating delamination. Restoration was delayed for 10 years, which caused extensive chemical attack on the concrete substrate-upwards of 2 in. (50 mm) of concrete loss. This article explains how one of these tanks was restored and prepared for another 15+ years of service.},
doi = {},
journal = {Materials Performance},
number = 11,
volume = 44,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Nov 01 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Tue Nov 01 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}