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Title: Determination of the effect of different additives in coking blends using a combination of in situ high-temperature {sup 1}H NMR and rheometry

Abstract

High-temperature {sup 1}H NMR and rheometry measurements were carried out on 4:1 wt/wt blends of a medium volatile bituminous coal with two anthracites, two petroleum cokes, charcoal, wood, a low-temperature coke breeze, tyre crumb, and active carbon to determine the effects on fluidity development to identify the parameters responsible for these effects during pyrolysis and to study possible relationships among the parameters derived from these techniques. Positive, negative, and neutral effects were identified on the concentration of fluid material. Small positive effects (ca. 5-6%) were caused by blending the coal with petroleum cokes. Charcoal, wood, and active carbon all exerted negative effects on concentration (18-27% reduction) and mobility (12-25% reduction in T2) of the fluid phase, which have been associated with the inert character and high surface areas of these additives that adsorb the fluid phase of the coal. One of the anthracites and the low-temperature coke breeze caused deleterious effects to a lesser extent on the concentration (7-12%) and mobility (13-17%) of the fluid material, possibly due to the high concentration of metals in these additives (ca. 11% ash). Despite the high fluid character of tyre crumb at the temperature of maximum fluidity of the coal (73%), the mobilitymore » of the fluid phase of the blend was lower than expected. The comparison of {sup 1}H NMR and rheometry results indicated that to account for the variations in minimum complex viscosity for all the blends, both the maximum concentration of fluid phase and the maximum mobility of the fluid material had to be considered. For individual blends, two exponential relationships have been found between the complex viscosity and the concentration of solid phase in both the softening and resolidification stages but the parameters are different for each blend. 30 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Nottingham University, Nottingham (United Kingdom). Nottingham Fuel and Energy Centre, School of Chemical, Environmental and Mining Engineering
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20688439
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Energy and Fuels; Journal Volume: 19; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: colin.snape@nottingham.ac.uk
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; COKING; ADDITIVES; BITUMINOUS COAL; ANTHRACITE; COKE; PETROLEUM PRODUCTS; CHARCOAL; WOOD; COKE BREEZE; TIRES; ACTIVATED CARBON; HYDROGEN 1; NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE; CONCENTRATION RATIO; MOBILITY; RHEOLOGY; MIXTURES

Citation Formats

Miguel C. Diaz, Karen M. Steel, Trevor C. Drage, John W. Patrick, and Colin E. Snape. Determination of the effect of different additives in coking blends using a combination of in situ high-temperature {sup 1}H NMR and rheometry. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.1021/ef050126n.
Miguel C. Diaz, Karen M. Steel, Trevor C. Drage, John W. Patrick, & Colin E. Snape. Determination of the effect of different additives in coking blends using a combination of in situ high-temperature {sup 1}H NMR and rheometry. United States. doi:10.1021/ef050126n.
Miguel C. Diaz, Karen M. Steel, Trevor C. Drage, John W. Patrick, and Colin E. Snape. Thu . "Determination of the effect of different additives in coking blends using a combination of in situ high-temperature {sup 1}H NMR and rheometry". United States. doi:10.1021/ef050126n.
@article{osti_20688439,
title = {Determination of the effect of different additives in coking blends using a combination of in situ high-temperature {sup 1}H NMR and rheometry},
author = {Miguel C. Diaz and Karen M. Steel and Trevor C. Drage and John W. Patrick and Colin E. Snape},
abstractNote = {High-temperature {sup 1}H NMR and rheometry measurements were carried out on 4:1 wt/wt blends of a medium volatile bituminous coal with two anthracites, two petroleum cokes, charcoal, wood, a low-temperature coke breeze, tyre crumb, and active carbon to determine the effects on fluidity development to identify the parameters responsible for these effects during pyrolysis and to study possible relationships among the parameters derived from these techniques. Positive, negative, and neutral effects were identified on the concentration of fluid material. Small positive effects (ca. 5-6%) were caused by blending the coal with petroleum cokes. Charcoal, wood, and active carbon all exerted negative effects on concentration (18-27% reduction) and mobility (12-25% reduction in T2) of the fluid phase, which have been associated with the inert character and high surface areas of these additives that adsorb the fluid phase of the coal. One of the anthracites and the low-temperature coke breeze caused deleterious effects to a lesser extent on the concentration (7-12%) and mobility (13-17%) of the fluid material, possibly due to the high concentration of metals in these additives (ca. 11% ash). Despite the high fluid character of tyre crumb at the temperature of maximum fluidity of the coal (73%), the mobility of the fluid phase of the blend was lower than expected. The comparison of {sup 1}H NMR and rheometry results indicated that to account for the variations in minimum complex viscosity for all the blends, both the maximum concentration of fluid phase and the maximum mobility of the fluid material had to be considered. For individual blends, two exponential relationships have been found between the complex viscosity and the concentration of solid phase in both the softening and resolidification stages but the parameters are different for each blend. 30 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.},
doi = {10.1021/ef050126n},
journal = {Energy and Fuels},
number = 6,
volume = 19,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Dec 01 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Thu Dec 01 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}
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