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Title: Field trips in the southern Rocky Mountains, USA

Abstract

The theme of the 2004 GSA Annual Meeting and Exposition, 'Geoscience in a Changing World' covers both new and traditional areas of the earth sciences. The Front Range of the Rocky Mountains and the High Plains preserve an outstanding record of geological processes from Precambrian through Quaternary times, and thus served as excellent educational exhibits for the meeting. The chapters in this field guide all contain technical content as well as a field trip log describing field trip routes and stops. Of the 25 field trips offered at the Meeting. 14 are described in the guidebook, covering a wide variety of geoscience disciplines, with chapters on tectonics (Precambrian and Laramide), stratigraphy and paleoenvironments (e.g., early Paleozoic environments, Jurassic eolian environments, the K-T boundary, the famous Oligocene Florissant fossil beds), economic deposits (coal and molybdenum), geological hazards, and geoarchaeology. Two papers have been abstracted separately for the Coal Abstracts database.

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. (eds.)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20688418
Resource Type:
Book
Resource Relation:
Related Information: GSA Field Guide 5
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; USA; ROCKY MOUNTAINS; COLORADO; NEW MEXICO; TEXAS; GEOLOGY; GEOLOGIC STRUCTURES; TECTONICS; STRATIGRAPHY

Citation Formats

Nelson, E.P., and Erslev, E.A. Field trips in the southern Rocky Mountains, USA. United States: N. p., 2004. Web.
Nelson, E.P., & Erslev, E.A. Field trips in the southern Rocky Mountains, USA. United States.
Nelson, E.P., and Erslev, E.A. Thu . "Field trips in the southern Rocky Mountains, USA". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_20688418,
title = {Field trips in the southern Rocky Mountains, USA},
author = {Nelson, E.P. and Erslev, E.A.},
abstractNote = {The theme of the 2004 GSA Annual Meeting and Exposition, 'Geoscience in a Changing World' covers both new and traditional areas of the earth sciences. The Front Range of the Rocky Mountains and the High Plains preserve an outstanding record of geological processes from Precambrian through Quaternary times, and thus served as excellent educational exhibits for the meeting. The chapters in this field guide all contain technical content as well as a field trip log describing field trip routes and stops. Of the 25 field trips offered at the Meeting. 14 are described in the guidebook, covering a wide variety of geoscience disciplines, with chapters on tectonics (Precambrian and Laramide), stratigraphy and paleoenvironments (e.g., early Paleozoic environments, Jurassic eolian environments, the K-T boundary, the famous Oligocene Florissant fossil beds), economic deposits (coal and molybdenum), geological hazards, and geoarchaeology. Two papers have been abstracted separately for the Coal Abstracts database.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 2004},
month = {Thu Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 2004}
}

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