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Title: Fluorescence photon migration by the boundary element method

Abstract

The use of the boundary element method (BEM) is explored as an alternative to the finite element method (FEM) solution methodology for the elliptic equations used to model the generation and transport of fluorescent light in highly scattering media, without the need for an internal volume mesh. The method is appropriate for domains where it is reasonable to assume the fluorescent properties are regionally homogeneous, such as when using highly specific molecularly targeted fluorescent contrast agents in biological tissues. In comparison to analytical results on a homogeneous sphere, BEM predictions of complex emission fluence are shown to be more accurate and stable than those of the FEM. Emission fluence predictions made with the BEM using a 708-node mesh, with roughly double the inter-node spacing of boundary nodes as in a 6956-node FEM mesh, match experimental frequency-domain fluorescence emission measurements acquired on a 1087 cm{sup 3} breast-mimicking phantom at least as well as those of the FEM, but require only 1/8 to 1/2 the computation time.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1];  [3];  [3]
  1. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT 05405 (United States)
  2. Department of Computer Science, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT 05405 (United States). E-mail: maggie.eppstein@uvm.edu
  3. Photon Migration Laboratories, Department of Chemistry, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77842-3012 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20687264
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Computational Physics; Journal Volume: 210; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.jcp.2005.04.003; PII: S0021-9991(05)00200-7; Copyright (c) 2005 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; BOUNDARY ELEMENT METHOD; CONTRAST MEDIA; EQUATIONS; FLUORESCENCE; MAMMARY GLANDS; PHANTOMS; PHOTONS; TOMOGRAPHY; VISIBLE RADIATION

Citation Formats

Fedele, Francesco, Eppstein, Margaret J., Laible, Jeffrey P., Godavarty, Anuradha, and Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.. Fluorescence photon migration by the boundary element method. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.1016/j.jcp.2005.04.003.
Fedele, Francesco, Eppstein, Margaret J., Laible, Jeffrey P., Godavarty, Anuradha, & Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.. Fluorescence photon migration by the boundary element method. United States. doi:10.1016/j.jcp.2005.04.003.
Fedele, Francesco, Eppstein, Margaret J., Laible, Jeffrey P., Godavarty, Anuradha, and Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.. Sun . "Fluorescence photon migration by the boundary element method". United States. doi:10.1016/j.jcp.2005.04.003.
@article{osti_20687264,
title = {Fluorescence photon migration by the boundary element method},
author = {Fedele, Francesco and Eppstein, Margaret J. and Laible, Jeffrey P. and Godavarty, Anuradha and Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.},
abstractNote = {The use of the boundary element method (BEM) is explored as an alternative to the finite element method (FEM) solution methodology for the elliptic equations used to model the generation and transport of fluorescent light in highly scattering media, without the need for an internal volume mesh. The method is appropriate for domains where it is reasonable to assume the fluorescent properties are regionally homogeneous, such as when using highly specific molecularly targeted fluorescent contrast agents in biological tissues. In comparison to analytical results on a homogeneous sphere, BEM predictions of complex emission fluence are shown to be more accurate and stable than those of the FEM. Emission fluence predictions made with the BEM using a 708-node mesh, with roughly double the inter-node spacing of boundary nodes as in a 6956-node FEM mesh, match experimental frequency-domain fluorescence emission measurements acquired on a 1087 cm{sup 3} breast-mimicking phantom at least as well as those of the FEM, but require only 1/8 to 1/2 the computation time.},
doi = {10.1016/j.jcp.2005.04.003},
journal = {Journal of Computational Physics},
number = 1,
volume = 210,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Nov 20 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Sun Nov 20 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}
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