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Title: New Metering Enables Simplified and More Efficient Rate Structures

Abstract

More sophisticated metering and communications technologies are now economically feasible for many more customers, allowing for rate designs that provide improved economic efficiency, transparency, simplicity and fairness, and allow customers to make efficient energy choices. Add the imperatives of the Energy Policy Act of 2005, and it may be time for utilities to assess upgrades to their metering and communications infrastructure and their rate structures.

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20681455
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Electricity Journal; Journal Volume: 18; Journal Issue: 10; Other Information: Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; PRICES; METERING; COMMUNICATIONS; ELECTRIC UTILITIES; ECONOMICS

Citation Formats

Irastorza, Veronica. New Metering Enables Simplified and More Efficient Rate Structures. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.1016/j.tej.2005.10.008.
Irastorza, Veronica. New Metering Enables Simplified and More Efficient Rate Structures. United States. doi:10.1016/j.tej.2005.10.008.
Irastorza, Veronica. Thu . "New Metering Enables Simplified and More Efficient Rate Structures". United States. doi:10.1016/j.tej.2005.10.008.
@article{osti_20681455,
title = {New Metering Enables Simplified and More Efficient Rate Structures},
author = {Irastorza, Veronica},
abstractNote = {More sophisticated metering and communications technologies are now economically feasible for many more customers, allowing for rate designs that provide improved economic efficiency, transparency, simplicity and fairness, and allow customers to make efficient energy choices. Add the imperatives of the Energy Policy Act of 2005, and it may be time for utilities to assess upgrades to their metering and communications infrastructure and their rate structures.},
doi = {10.1016/j.tej.2005.10.008},
journal = {Electricity Journal},
number = 10,
volume = 18,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Dec 01 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Thu Dec 01 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}
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