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Title: Environmental effects of interstate power trading on electricity consumption mixes

Abstract

Although many studies of electricity generation use national or state average generation mix assumptions, in reality a great deal of electricity is transferred between states with very different mixes of fossil and renewable fuels, and using the average numbers could result in incorrect conclusions in these studies. The authors create electricity consumption profiles for each state and for key industry sectors in the U.S. based on existing state generation profiles, net state power imports, industry presence by state, and an optimization model to estimate interstate electricity trading. Using these 'consumption mixes' can provide a more accurate assessment of electricity use in life-cycle analyses. It is concluded that the published generation mixes for states that import power are misleading, since the power consumed in-state has a different makeup than the power that was generated. And, while most industry sectors have consumption mixes similar to the U.S. average, some of the most critical sectors of the economy - such as resource extraction and material processing sectors - are very different. This result does validate the average mix assumption made in many environmental assessments, but it is important to accurately quantify the generation methods for electricity used when doing life-cycle analyses. 16 refs.,more » 7 figs., 2 tabs.« less

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20681352
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Environmental Science and Technology; Journal Volume: 39; Journal Issue: 22; Other Information: marriott@cmu.edu
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT; ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS; ELECTRIC POWER; POWER GENERATION; ENERGY CONSUMPTION; SECTORAL ANALYSIS; INDUSTRY; IMPORTS; DOMESTIC SUPPLIES; TRADE; DIVERSIFICATION; ENERGY SOURCES; MIXTURES; FOSSIL FUELS; RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES

Citation Formats

Joe Marriott, and H. Scott Matthews. Environmental effects of interstate power trading on electricity consumption mixes. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.1021/es0506859.
Joe Marriott, & H. Scott Matthews. Environmental effects of interstate power trading on electricity consumption mixes. United States. doi:10.1021/es0506859.
Joe Marriott, and H. Scott Matthews. Tue . "Environmental effects of interstate power trading on electricity consumption mixes". United States. doi:10.1021/es0506859.
@article{osti_20681352,
title = {Environmental effects of interstate power trading on electricity consumption mixes},
author = {Joe Marriott and H. Scott Matthews},
abstractNote = {Although many studies of electricity generation use national or state average generation mix assumptions, in reality a great deal of electricity is transferred between states with very different mixes of fossil and renewable fuels, and using the average numbers could result in incorrect conclusions in these studies. The authors create electricity consumption profiles for each state and for key industry sectors in the U.S. based on existing state generation profiles, net state power imports, industry presence by state, and an optimization model to estimate interstate electricity trading. Using these 'consumption mixes' can provide a more accurate assessment of electricity use in life-cycle analyses. It is concluded that the published generation mixes for states that import power are misleading, since the power consumed in-state has a different makeup than the power that was generated. And, while most industry sectors have consumption mixes similar to the U.S. average, some of the most critical sectors of the economy - such as resource extraction and material processing sectors - are very different. This result does validate the average mix assumption made in many environmental assessments, but it is important to accurately quantify the generation methods for electricity used when doing life-cycle analyses. 16 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.},
doi = {10.1021/es0506859},
journal = {Environmental Science and Technology},
number = 22,
volume = 39,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Nov 15 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Tue Nov 15 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}
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