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Title: Public Utility Commission Regulation and Cost-Effectiveness of Title IV: Lessons for CAIR

Abstract

There is growing evidence that the cost savings potential of the Title IV SO{sub 2} cap-and-trade program is not being reached. PUC regulatory treatment of compliance options appears to provide one explanation for this finding. That suggests that PUCs and utility companies should work together to develop incentive plans that will encourage cost-minimizing behavior for compliance with the EPA's recently issued Clean Air Interstate Rule.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20677721
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Electricity Journal; Journal Volume: 18; Journal Issue: 8; Other Information: Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; REGULATIONS; COST BENEFIT ANALYSIS; COMPLIANCE; SULFUR DIOXIDE; STATE GOVERNMENT

Citation Formats

Sotkiewicz, Paul M., and Holt, Lynne. Public Utility Commission Regulation and Cost-Effectiveness of Title IV: Lessons for CAIR. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.1016/j.tej.2005.08.003.
Sotkiewicz, Paul M., & Holt, Lynne. Public Utility Commission Regulation and Cost-Effectiveness of Title IV: Lessons for CAIR. United States. doi:10.1016/j.tej.2005.08.003.
Sotkiewicz, Paul M., and Holt, Lynne. 2005. "Public Utility Commission Regulation and Cost-Effectiveness of Title IV: Lessons for CAIR". United States. doi:10.1016/j.tej.2005.08.003.
@article{osti_20677721,
title = {Public Utility Commission Regulation and Cost-Effectiveness of Title IV: Lessons for CAIR},
author = {Sotkiewicz, Paul M. and Holt, Lynne},
abstractNote = {There is growing evidence that the cost savings potential of the Title IV SO{sub 2} cap-and-trade program is not being reached. PUC regulatory treatment of compliance options appears to provide one explanation for this finding. That suggests that PUCs and utility companies should work together to develop incentive plans that will encourage cost-minimizing behavior for compliance with the EPA's recently issued Clean Air Interstate Rule.},
doi = {10.1016/j.tej.2005.08.003},
journal = {Electricity Journal},
number = 8,
volume = 18,
place = {United States},
year = 2005,
month =
}
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