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Title: Quantum fingerprinting with a single particle

Abstract

We show that the two-slit experiment in which a single quantum particle interferes with itself can be interpreted as a quantum fingerprinting protocol: the interference pattern exhibited by the particle contains information about the environment it encountered in the slits which would require much more communication to learn classically than is required quantum mechanically. An extension to the case where the particle has many internal degrees of freedom is suggested, and its interpretation is discussed. The interpretation of these results is discussed in detail, and a possible experimental realization is proposed.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Laboratoire d'Information Quantique and Centre for Quantum Information and Communication (QUIC), Universite Libre de Bruxelles, C.P. 165/59, Avenue F.D. Roosevelt 50, 1050 Brussels (Belgium)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20650192
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review. A; Journal Volume: 71; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevA.71.012310; (c) 2005 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
74 ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS; CORRELATIONS; DATA TRANSMISSION; DEGREES OF FREEDOM; ENERGY LEVELS; INFORMATION; INTERFERENCE; OPTICS; QUANTUM MECHANICS; QUANTUM NUMBERS

Citation Formats

Massar, S. Quantum fingerprinting with a single particle. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.1103/PhysRevA.71.012310.
Massar, S. Quantum fingerprinting with a single particle. United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevA.71.012310.
Massar, S. 2005. "Quantum fingerprinting with a single particle". United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevA.71.012310.
@article{osti_20650192,
title = {Quantum fingerprinting with a single particle},
author = {Massar, S.},
abstractNote = {We show that the two-slit experiment in which a single quantum particle interferes with itself can be interpreted as a quantum fingerprinting protocol: the interference pattern exhibited by the particle contains information about the environment it encountered in the slits which would require much more communication to learn classically than is required quantum mechanically. An extension to the case where the particle has many internal degrees of freedom is suggested, and its interpretation is discussed. The interpretation of these results is discussed in detail, and a possible experimental realization is proposed.},
doi = {10.1103/PhysRevA.71.012310},
journal = {Physical Review. A},
number = 1,
volume = 71,
place = {United States},
year = 2005,
month = 1
}
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  • No abstract prepared.