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Title: Mimicking time evolution within a quantum ground state: Ground-state quantum computation, cloning, and teleportation

Abstract

Ground-state quantum computers mimic quantum-mechanical time evolution within the amplitudes of a time-independent quantum state. We explore the principles that constrain this mimicking. A no-cloning argument is found to impose strong restrictions. It is shown, however, that there is flexibility that can be exploited using quantum teleportation methods to improve ground-state quantum computer design.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20643876
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review. A; Journal Volume: 70; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevA.70.012304; (c) 2004 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
74 ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS; AMPLITUDES; COMMUNICATIONS; CORRELATIONS; DESIGN; EVOLUTION; FLEXIBILITY; GROUND STATES; INFORMATION THEORY; QUANTUM MECHANICS

Citation Formats

Mizel, Ari. Mimicking time evolution within a quantum ground state: Ground-state quantum computation, cloning, and teleportation. United States: N. p., 2004. Web. doi:10.1103/PhysRevA.70.012304.
Mizel, Ari. Mimicking time evolution within a quantum ground state: Ground-state quantum computation, cloning, and teleportation. United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevA.70.012304.
Mizel, Ari. 2004. "Mimicking time evolution within a quantum ground state: Ground-state quantum computation, cloning, and teleportation". United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevA.70.012304.
@article{osti_20643876,
title = {Mimicking time evolution within a quantum ground state: Ground-state quantum computation, cloning, and teleportation},
author = {Mizel, Ari},
abstractNote = {Ground-state quantum computers mimic quantum-mechanical time evolution within the amplitudes of a time-independent quantum state. We explore the principles that constrain this mimicking. A no-cloning argument is found to impose strong restrictions. It is shown, however, that there is flexibility that can be exploited using quantum teleportation methods to improve ground-state quantum computer design.},
doi = {10.1103/PhysRevA.70.012304},
journal = {Physical Review. A},
number = 1,
volume = 70,
place = {United States},
year = 2004,
month = 7
}
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