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Title: Climate change in Latin America and the Caribbean. A review of the Bonn and Marrakech decisions and their effect on the clean development mechanism of the Kyoto protocol

Abstract

The objective of this document is to present an overview of recent climate change developments, in particular with regards to carbon markets under the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM). The document is divided into three sections. The first section describes the history of the climate change negotiations. Section two presents an overview of the recent decisions adopted at the last international meetings (Bonn Agreements and Marrakech Accord), which have improved the odds of ratification of the Kyoto Protocol by 2002. The third section analyzes the carbon credit market. The first part of this section briefly presents the available information regarding real carbon credit transactions, while the second section focuses on the literature review of several theoretical models and presents the theoretical estimates of the price and size of the carbon market.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Environment Division, Sustainable Development Department, Inter-American Development Bank, Washington DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
20642660
Resource Type:
Miscellaneous
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Working Paper
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; CLIMATIC CHANGE; LATIN AMERICA; CARIBBEAN SEA; KYOTO PROTOCOL; MARKET; NEGOTIATION; CARBON DIOXIDE; PRICES; MATHEMATICAL MODELS

Citation Formats

Maggiora, C. della. Climate change in Latin America and the Caribbean. A review of the Bonn and Marrakech decisions and their effect on the clean development mechanism of the Kyoto protocol. United States: N. p., 2002. Web.
Maggiora, C. della. Climate change in Latin America and the Caribbean. A review of the Bonn and Marrakech decisions and their effect on the clean development mechanism of the Kyoto protocol. United States.
Maggiora, C. della. 2002. "Climate change in Latin America and the Caribbean. A review of the Bonn and Marrakech decisions and their effect on the clean development mechanism of the Kyoto protocol". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_20642660,
title = {Climate change in Latin America and the Caribbean. A review of the Bonn and Marrakech decisions and their effect on the clean development mechanism of the Kyoto protocol},
author = {Maggiora, C. della},
abstractNote = {The objective of this document is to present an overview of recent climate change developments, in particular with regards to carbon markets under the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM). The document is divided into three sections. The first section describes the history of the climate change negotiations. Section two presents an overview of the recent decisions adopted at the last international meetings (Bonn Agreements and Marrakech Accord), which have improved the odds of ratification of the Kyoto Protocol by 2002. The third section analyzes the carbon credit market. The first part of this section briefly presents the available information regarding real carbon credit transactions, while the second section focuses on the literature review of several theoretical models and presents the theoretical estimates of the price and size of the carbon market.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2002,
month = 4
}

Miscellaneous:
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