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Title: Gate-controlled resonant interband tunneling in silicon

Abstract

We present gate-controlled resonant interband tunneling on silicon <111>. The investigated structure principally consists of a vertical, gated p-i-n diode grown by molecular beam epitaxy. We evaluated the surface tunnel current from a gate-induced two-dimensional electron channel into the quantized hole states of a degenerately doped {delta}p{sup +} layer. This current reveals a negative differential resistance due to resonant interband tunneling in the forward biased p-i-n diode at 200 K. Even at room temperature the influence of this tunnel mechanism is observed. The experimental results are in good agreement with simulated band diagrams and their dependence on the applied voltages.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Institute of Physics, Universitaet der Bundeswehr Muenchen, Werner-Heisenberg-Weg 39, D-85577 Neubiberg (Germany)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20632772
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 85; Journal Issue: 10; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.1783023; (c) 2004 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; DOPED MATERIALS; ELECTRIC POTENTIAL; ELECTRONS; FERMI LEVEL; HOLES; P-N JUNCTIONS; SEMICONDUCTOR MATERIALS; SILICON; TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE; TEMPERATURE RANGE 0065-0273 K; TEMPERATURE RANGE 0273-0400 K; TUNNEL EFFECT

Citation Formats

Sedlmaier, S., Bhuwalka, Krishna K., Ludsteck, A., Schmidt, M., Schulze, J., Hansch, W., and Eisele, I.. Gate-controlled resonant interband tunneling in silicon. United States: N. p., 2004. Web. doi:10.1063/1.1783023.
Sedlmaier, S., Bhuwalka, Krishna K., Ludsteck, A., Schmidt, M., Schulze, J., Hansch, W., & Eisele, I.. Gate-controlled resonant interband tunneling in silicon. United States. doi:10.1063/1.1783023.
Sedlmaier, S., Bhuwalka, Krishna K., Ludsteck, A., Schmidt, M., Schulze, J., Hansch, W., and Eisele, I.. 2004. "Gate-controlled resonant interband tunneling in silicon". United States. doi:10.1063/1.1783023.
@article{osti_20632772,
title = {Gate-controlled resonant interband tunneling in silicon},
author = {Sedlmaier, S. and Bhuwalka, Krishna K. and Ludsteck, A. and Schmidt, M. and Schulze, J. and Hansch, W. and Eisele, I.},
abstractNote = {We present gate-controlled resonant interband tunneling on silicon <111>. The investigated structure principally consists of a vertical, gated p-i-n diode grown by molecular beam epitaxy. We evaluated the surface tunnel current from a gate-induced two-dimensional electron channel into the quantized hole states of a degenerately doped {delta}p{sup +} layer. This current reveals a negative differential resistance due to resonant interband tunneling in the forward biased p-i-n diode at 200 K. Even at room temperature the influence of this tunnel mechanism is observed. The experimental results are in good agreement with simulated band diagrams and their dependence on the applied voltages.},
doi = {10.1063/1.1783023},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 10,
volume = 85,
place = {United States},
year = 2004,
month = 9
}
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