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Title: Estimating the diameter/thickness of a pipe using the primary wave velocity of a hollow cylindrical guided wave

Abstract

A method for measuring the diameter/thickness (d/t) of a pipe using a characteristic of a hollow cylindrical guided wave (HCGW) is presented. The HCGW is an ultrasonic guided wave propagating along a pipe. In the first part of this letter, we briefly show that the primary wave (first-arriving wave packet from an impulse source) of the HCGW achieves a faster group velocity for a larger d/t. Experimental verifications were carried out for aluminum pipes (several different d/t's) using a laser ultrasonic method to generate the HCGW. The experimental results are in fairly good agreement with the theoretical prediction described.

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [2];  [2]
  1. Faculty of Engineering, The University of Tokushima, Tokushima 770-8506 (Japan)
  2. (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20632712
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 85; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.1781353; (c) 2004 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; ALUMINIUM; PIPES; PULSES; THICKNESS; ULTRASONIC TESTING; VERIFICATION; WAVE PACKETS

Citation Formats

Nishino, Hideo, Takemoto, Mikio, Chubachi, Noriyoshi, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Aoyama Gakuin University, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 229-8560, and Faculty of Engineering, Tohoku Gakuin University, Tagajyo, Miyagi 985-8537. Estimating the diameter/thickness of a pipe using the primary wave velocity of a hollow cylindrical guided wave. United States: N. p., 2004. Web. doi:10.1063/1.1781353.
Nishino, Hideo, Takemoto, Mikio, Chubachi, Noriyoshi, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Aoyama Gakuin University, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 229-8560, & Faculty of Engineering, Tohoku Gakuin University, Tagajyo, Miyagi 985-8537. Estimating the diameter/thickness of a pipe using the primary wave velocity of a hollow cylindrical guided wave. United States. doi:10.1063/1.1781353.
Nishino, Hideo, Takemoto, Mikio, Chubachi, Noriyoshi, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Aoyama Gakuin University, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 229-8560, and Faculty of Engineering, Tohoku Gakuin University, Tagajyo, Miyagi 985-8537. Mon . "Estimating the diameter/thickness of a pipe using the primary wave velocity of a hollow cylindrical guided wave". United States. doi:10.1063/1.1781353.
@article{osti_20632712,
title = {Estimating the diameter/thickness of a pipe using the primary wave velocity of a hollow cylindrical guided wave},
author = {Nishino, Hideo and Takemoto, Mikio and Chubachi, Noriyoshi and Faculty of Science and Engineering, Aoyama Gakuin University, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 229-8560 and Faculty of Engineering, Tohoku Gakuin University, Tagajyo, Miyagi 985-8537},
abstractNote = {A method for measuring the diameter/thickness (d/t) of a pipe using a characteristic of a hollow cylindrical guided wave (HCGW) is presented. The HCGW is an ultrasonic guided wave propagating along a pipe. In the first part of this letter, we briefly show that the primary wave (first-arriving wave packet from an impulse source) of the HCGW achieves a faster group velocity for a larger d/t. Experimental verifications were carried out for aluminum pipes (several different d/t's) using a laser ultrasonic method to generate the HCGW. The experimental results are in fairly good agreement with the theoretical prediction described.},
doi = {10.1063/1.1781353},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 6,
volume = 85,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Aug 09 00:00:00 EDT 2004},
month = {Mon Aug 09 00:00:00 EDT 2004}
}
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