skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Emission Spectroscopy of Highly Charged Ions in Plasma of an Electron Beam Ion Trap

Abstract

The results of experimental study of magnetic dipole (M1) transitions in highly charged ions of argon (Ar9+, Ar10+, Ar13+ and Ar14+) and krypton (Kr18+ and Kr22+) are presented. The forbidden transitions of the highly charged ions in the visible and near UV range of the photon emission spectra have been measured with accuracy better than 1 ppm. Our measurements for the 'coronal lines' are the most accurate yet reported using an EBIT as a spectroscopic source of highly charged ions. These precise wavelength determinations provide a useful test and challenge for atomic structure calculations of many-electron systems.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]; ; ;  [3];  [4];  [5];  [6];  [7]
  1. Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)
  2. (Germany)
  3. Max-Planck Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)
  4. University of Missouri-Rolla, Physics Building, Rolla, MO 63409-0640 (United States)
  5. Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Science, 117924 Moscow (Russian Federation)
  6. Department of Physics, University of Kassel, Heinrich-Plett-St. 40, D-34132 Kassel (Germany)
  7. Applied Ion Beam Physics Lab, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20630452
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 740; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: 22. summer school and international symposium on the physics of ionized gases, Bajina Basta (Serbia and Montenegro), 23-27 Aug 2004; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.1843520; (c) 2004 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
74 ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS; ARGON; ELECTRON BEAMS; ELECTRON SPECTRA; ELECTRONS; EMISSION SPECTRA; EMISSION SPECTROSCOPY; FORBIDDEN TRANSITIONS; IONS; KRYPTON; M1-TRANSITIONS; MAGNETIC DIPOLES; PHOTOELECTRON SPECTROSCOPY; PHOTON EMISSION; PLASMA; TRAPS

Citation Formats

Draganic, I., Max-Planck Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg, Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, J.R., Soria Orts, R., Ullrich, J., DuBois, R., Shevelko, V., Fritzsche, S., and Zou, Y. Emission Spectroscopy of Highly Charged Ions in Plasma of an Electron Beam Ion Trap. United States: N. p., 2004. Web. doi:10.1063/1.1843520.
Draganic, I., Max-Planck Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg, Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, J.R., Soria Orts, R., Ullrich, J., DuBois, R., Shevelko, V., Fritzsche, S., & Zou, Y. Emission Spectroscopy of Highly Charged Ions in Plasma of an Electron Beam Ion Trap. United States. doi:10.1063/1.1843520.
Draganic, I., Max-Planck Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg, Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, J.R., Soria Orts, R., Ullrich, J., DuBois, R., Shevelko, V., Fritzsche, S., and Zou, Y. 2004. "Emission Spectroscopy of Highly Charged Ions in Plasma of an Electron Beam Ion Trap". United States. doi:10.1063/1.1843520.
@article{osti_20630452,
title = {Emission Spectroscopy of Highly Charged Ions in Plasma of an Electron Beam Ion Trap},
author = {Draganic, I. and Max-Planck Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg and Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, J.R. and Soria Orts, R. and Ullrich, J. and DuBois, R. and Shevelko, V. and Fritzsche, S. and Zou, Y.},
abstractNote = {The results of experimental study of magnetic dipole (M1) transitions in highly charged ions of argon (Ar9+, Ar10+, Ar13+ and Ar14+) and krypton (Kr18+ and Kr22+) are presented. The forbidden transitions of the highly charged ions in the visible and near UV range of the photon emission spectra have been measured with accuracy better than 1 ppm. Our measurements for the 'coronal lines' are the most accurate yet reported using an EBIT as a spectroscopic source of highly charged ions. These precise wavelength determinations provide a useful test and challenge for atomic structure calculations of many-electron systems.},
doi = {10.1063/1.1843520},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 740,
place = {United States},
year = 2004,
month =
}
  • The high-energy electron beam ion trap SuperEBIT at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory allows the study of the x-ray emission from highly charged ions interacting with electrons with energy in excess of 200 keV. Radiation from ions as highly charged as Cf96+ has been produced this way. The facility is being used to investigate the contributions from quantum electrodynamics in heavy ions. Here the focus is lithiumlike ions, especially U89+, which provide the opportunity for the most accurate test of QED in highly charged ions. We have also used the facility to measure the degree of x-ray line polarization asmore » a function of the energy of the electron collision energy. For example, we have studied the linear polarization of the K-shell emission lines of Fe24+ for electron-impact energies high as 120 keV. A new area of research is the investigation of nuclear excitation by electronic transitions. This is the inverse process of internal conversion, where an atomic x ray is absorbed by the nucleus resulting in an excited nuclear state. We are planning to study this process in 189Os using 217 keV atomic x rays generated in the interaction with a 196 keV electron beam.« less
  • An electron-beam ion trap (EBIT) has just been completed in the Clarendon Laboratory, Oxford. The design is similar to the devices installed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. It is intended that the Oxford EBIT will be used for x-ray and UV spectroscopy of hydrogenic and helium-like ions, laser resonance spectroscopy of hydrogenic ions and measurements of dielectronic recombination cross sections, in order to test current understanding of simple highly charged ions.
  • Extreme-ultraviolet spectra of xenon ions have been recorded in the 4.5 to 20 nm wavelength region using an electron beam ion trap and a flat field spectrometer. The electron beam energy was varied from 180 eV to 8 keV and radiation from charge states Xe{sup 6+} to Xe{sup 43+} was observed. Our measured wavelengths were compared to atomic structure calculations using the Cowan suite of codes. We have measured seventeen previously unreported features corresponding to transitions in Xe{sup 35+} through to Xe{sup 41+} with estimated wavelength uncertainties of {+-}0.003 nm. It was found that for the case of continuous injectionmore » of neutral xenon gas a wide range of charge states were always present in the trap but this charge state distribution was greatly narrowed, towards higher charge states, if a sufficiently low gas injection pressure was employed. The energy dependence of spectral lines arising from Xe{sup 42+} and Xe{sup 43+} revealed enhancement of the total ionization cross sections, due to excitation-autoionization of n=2 electrons to n=3 levels, in the Xe{sup 41+} and Xe{sup 42+} charge states.« less
  • Systematic variation of the electron-beam energy in an electron-beam ion trap has been employed to produce soft-X-ray spectra of Os, Bi, Th, and U with highest charge states ranging up to Ni-like ions. Guided by relativistic atomic structure calculations, the strongest lines have been identified with {Delta}n = 0 (n = 4 to n' = 4) transitions in Rb- to Cu-like ions. The rather weak 4p-4d transitions are much less affected by QED contributions than the dominant 4s-4p transitions. Our wavelength measurements consequently provide benchmarks with and (almost) without QED. Because the radiative corrections are not very sensitive to themore » number of electrons in the valence shell, our data, moreover, provide benchmarks for the evaluation of electron-electron interactions.« less
  • The mechanism of evaporative cooling of highly charged ions in an electron-beam ion trap (EBIT) is discussed. Computer simulations of evaporative cooling in superEBIT indicate that with the use of neon, nitrogen, or helium coolants, significant amounts of bare and hydrogenlike dysprosium ions can be trapped indefinitely for the observation of bound-state {beta} decay.