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Title: Generation of high-power, subpicosecond, submillimeter radiation for applications in novel device development and materials research

Abstract

This research exploits the high-energy, ultrafast laser technology and high voltage expertise at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to scale submillimeter-pulse generation with photoconducting antennas to large aperture sizes and high output powers. An experimental and theoretical approach was undertaken with a view towards optimizing the radiated output and determining the technology`s ultimate scalability. This is the final report of a three-year Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at LANL.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
205970
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-95-4180
ON: DE96004789
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-36
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: [1995]
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
66 PHYSICS; RADIATION SOURCES; RESEARCH PROGRAMS; GALLIUM ARSENIDES; STIMULATED EMISSION; INDIUM PHOSPHIDES; MICROWAVE RADIATION; LASER RADIATION; PULSES; PHOTOCONDUCTORS

Citation Formats

Taylor, A.J., Roberts, J.P., Kurnit, N.A., Benicewicz, P.K., Rodriquez, G., Redondo, A., Smith, D.L.G., and Carrig, T.J. Generation of high-power, subpicosecond, submillimeter radiation for applications in novel device development and materials research. United States: N. p., 1995. Web. doi:10.2172/205970.
Taylor, A.J., Roberts, J.P., Kurnit, N.A., Benicewicz, P.K., Rodriquez, G., Redondo, A., Smith, D.L.G., & Carrig, T.J. Generation of high-power, subpicosecond, submillimeter radiation for applications in novel device development and materials research. United States. doi:10.2172/205970.
Taylor, A.J., Roberts, J.P., Kurnit, N.A., Benicewicz, P.K., Rodriquez, G., Redondo, A., Smith, D.L.G., and Carrig, T.J. Sun . "Generation of high-power, subpicosecond, submillimeter radiation for applications in novel device development and materials research". United States. doi:10.2172/205970. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/205970.
@article{osti_205970,
title = {Generation of high-power, subpicosecond, submillimeter radiation for applications in novel device development and materials research},
author = {Taylor, A.J. and Roberts, J.P. and Kurnit, N.A. and Benicewicz, P.K. and Rodriquez, G. and Redondo, A. and Smith, D.L.G. and Carrig, T.J.},
abstractNote = {This research exploits the high-energy, ultrafast laser technology and high voltage expertise at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to scale submillimeter-pulse generation with photoconducting antennas to large aperture sizes and high output powers. An experimental and theoretical approach was undertaken with a view towards optimizing the radiated output and determining the technology`s ultimate scalability. This is the final report of a three-year Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at LANL.},
doi = {10.2172/205970},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 1995},
month = {Sun Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 1995}
}

Technical Report:

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