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Title: Utilization of domestic fuels for hydrogen production

Abstract

This article describes the present status of the conventional hydrogen production technologies and some of recent developments in the production of hydrogen using solar energy resources. The authors outline the technological status for commercial and near-commercial technologies using both fossil-based and renewable energy sources such as electrolysis using PV and solar thermal power. The conversion of fossil fuels and electrolysis of water using solar conversion technologies are some of the most important methods of H{sub 2} production. An economic analysis for hydrogen production costs is presented comparing steam reformation, partial oxidation, coal gasification, and electrolysis via photovoltaic and solar thermal power. Although fossil fuels are currently the cheapest and most widely used sources of hydrogen production, it is argued from an economic standpoint that renewable sources of hydrogen, such as biomass and solar, are the most promising options for the future. Further, solar hydrogen represents a storable fuel that is produced from this nonstorable and intermittent source of energy. 17 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States). Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20490079
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Power and Energy Systems; Journal Volume: 24; Journal Issue: 3; Conference: International conference on co-utilization of domestic fuels, Gainesville, FL (United States), 5-6 Feb 2003
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
08 HYDROGEN; 01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; 14 SOLAR ENERGY; 09 BIOMASS FUELS; HYDROGEN PRODUCTION; FOSSIL FUELS; NATURAL GAS; STEAM REFORMER PROCESSES; GASIFICATION; COAL; COAL GASIFICATION; METHANE; ELECTROLYSIS; HYDROCARBONS; AMMONIA; CAPITALIZED COST; SOLAR POWER PLANTS; PARTIAL OXIDATION PROCESSES; PHOTOVOLTAIC POWER PLANTS; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; COST; RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES; ECONOMIC ANALYSIS

Citation Formats

Mirabal, S.T., Ingley, H.A., Goel, N., and Goswami, D.Y. Utilization of domestic fuels for hydrogen production. United States: N. p., 2004. Web. doi:10.2316/Journal.203.2004.3.203-3423.
Mirabal, S.T., Ingley, H.A., Goel, N., & Goswami, D.Y. Utilization of domestic fuels for hydrogen production. United States. doi:10.2316/Journal.203.2004.3.203-3423.
Mirabal, S.T., Ingley, H.A., Goel, N., and Goswami, D.Y. Thu . "Utilization of domestic fuels for hydrogen production". United States. doi:10.2316/Journal.203.2004.3.203-3423.
@article{osti_20490079,
title = {Utilization of domestic fuels for hydrogen production},
author = {Mirabal, S.T. and Ingley, H.A. and Goel, N. and Goswami, D.Y.},
abstractNote = {This article describes the present status of the conventional hydrogen production technologies and some of recent developments in the production of hydrogen using solar energy resources. The authors outline the technological status for commercial and near-commercial technologies using both fossil-based and renewable energy sources such as electrolysis using PV and solar thermal power. The conversion of fossil fuels and electrolysis of water using solar conversion technologies are some of the most important methods of H{sub 2} production. An economic analysis for hydrogen production costs is presented comparing steam reformation, partial oxidation, coal gasification, and electrolysis via photovoltaic and solar thermal power. Although fossil fuels are currently the cheapest and most widely used sources of hydrogen production, it is argued from an economic standpoint that renewable sources of hydrogen, such as biomass and solar, are the most promising options for the future. Further, solar hydrogen represents a storable fuel that is produced from this nonstorable and intermittent source of energy. 17 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.},
doi = {10.2316/Journal.203.2004.3.203-3423},
journal = {International Journal of Power and Energy Systems},
number = 3,
volume = 24,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 2004},
month = {Thu Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 2004}
}