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Title: Advances in welding science and technology

Abstract

Over the years, welding has been more of an art than a science, but in the last few decades major advances have taken place in welding science and technology. With the development of new methodologies at the crossroads of basic and applied sciences, enormous opportunities and potential exist to develop a science-based design of composition, structure, and properties of welds with intelligent control and automation of the welding processes. In the last several decades, welding has evolved as an interdisciplinary activity requiring synthesis of knowledge from various disciplines and incorporating the most advanced tools of various basic applied sciences. A series of international conferences and other publications have covered the issues, current trends and directions in welding science and technology. In the last few decades, major progress has been made in (i) understanding physical processes in welding, (ii) characterization of microstructure and properties, and (iii) intelligent control and automation of welding. This paper describes some of these developments.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
203418
Report Number(s):
CONF-9509327-1
ON: DE96005544; TRN: 96:008597
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-84OR21400
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: International workshop on recent trends in welding, Bangalore (India), 1-10 Sep 1995; Other Information: PBD: [1995]
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 42 ENGINEERING NOT INCLUDED IN OTHER CATEGORIES; WELDING; WELDED JOINTS; MELTING; SOLIDIFICATION

Citation Formats

David, S.A., Babu, S.S., and Vitek, J.M.. Advances in welding science and technology. United States: N. p., 1995. Web.
David, S.A., Babu, S.S., & Vitek, J.M.. Advances in welding science and technology. United States.
David, S.A., Babu, S.S., and Vitek, J.M.. Sun . "Advances in welding science and technology". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/203418.
@article{osti_203418,
title = {Advances in welding science and technology},
author = {David, S.A. and Babu, S.S. and Vitek, J.M.},
abstractNote = {Over the years, welding has been more of an art than a science, but in the last few decades major advances have taken place in welding science and technology. With the development of new methodologies at the crossroads of basic and applied sciences, enormous opportunities and potential exist to develop a science-based design of composition, structure, and properties of welds with intelligent control and automation of the welding processes. In the last several decades, welding has evolved as an interdisciplinary activity requiring synthesis of knowledge from various disciplines and incorporating the most advanced tools of various basic applied sciences. A series of international conferences and other publications have covered the issues, current trends and directions in welding science and technology. In the last few decades, major progress has been made in (i) understanding physical processes in welding, (ii) characterization of microstructure and properties, and (iii) intelligent control and automation of welding. This paper describes some of these developments.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 1995},
month = {Sun Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 1995}
}

Conference:
Other availability
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  • The ultimate goal of welding technology is to improve the joint integrity and increase productivity. Over the years, welding has been more of an art than a science, but in the last few decades major advances have taken place in welding science and technology. With the development of new methodologies at the crossroads of basic and applied sciences, enormous opportunities and potential exist to develop a science-based tailoring of composition, structure, and properties of welds with intelligent control and automation of the welding processes.
  • The 94 papers in this book focus mainly on the basic welding research trends that are providing the thrust for further advances in welding technology. They also look at welding as an engineered science rather than an art. Because of this unique multidisciplinary approach to welding research, arc characteristics and arc-metal interactions are better understood.
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  • In addition to developing the rigid substrate welded conventional cell panels for an earlier U.S. flight program, LMSC recently demonstrated a welded lightweight array system using both 2 x 4 and 5.9 x 5.9 cm wraparound solar cells. This weld system uses infrared sensing of weld joint temperature at the cell contact metalization interface to precisely control weld energy on each joint. Modules fabricated using this weld control system survived lowearth-orbit simulated 5-year tests (over 30,000 cycles) without joint failure. The data from these specifically configured modules, printed circuit substrate with copper interconnect and dielectric wraparound solar cells, can bemore » used as a basis for developing weld schedules for additional cell array panel types.« less
  • These proceedings are the result of the Fourth Annual AAAS Colloquium on science, arms control, and national security, sponsored by the Program on Science, Arms Control, and National Security of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Separate abstracts were prepared for the twelve papers included.