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Title: Orientation Dependence in Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Shocked Single Crystals

Abstract

We use multimillion-atom molecular dynamics simulations to study shock wave propagation in fcc crystals. As shown recently, shock waves along the <100> direction form intersecting stacking faults by slippage along {l_brace}111{r_brace} close-packed planes at sufficiently high shock strengths. We find even more interesting behavior of shocks propagating in other low-index directions: for the <111> case, an elastic precursor separates the shock front from the slipped (plastic) region. Shock waves along the <110> direction generate a leading solitary wave train, followed (at sufficiently high shock speeds) by an elastic precursor, and then a region of complex plastic deformation. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20216797
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Physical Review Letters
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 84; Journal Issue: 23; Other Information: PBD: 5 Jun 2000; Journal ID: ISSN 0031-9007
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; SHOCK WAVES; MONOCRYSTALS; COMPUTER CODES; MOLECULAR DYNAMICS METHOD; SIMULATION; STACKING FAULTS; PLASTICITY; FCC LATTICES; THEORETICAL DATA

Citation Formats

Germann, Timothy C., Holian, Brad Lee, Lomdahl, Peter S., and Ravelo, Ramon. Orientation Dependence in Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Shocked Single Crystals. United States: N. p., 2000. Web. doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.84.5351.
Germann, Timothy C., Holian, Brad Lee, Lomdahl, Peter S., & Ravelo, Ramon. Orientation Dependence in Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Shocked Single Crystals. United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.84.5351.
Germann, Timothy C., Holian, Brad Lee, Lomdahl, Peter S., and Ravelo, Ramon. Mon . "Orientation Dependence in Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Shocked Single Crystals". United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.84.5351.
@article{osti_20216797,
title = {Orientation Dependence in Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Shocked Single Crystals},
author = {Germann, Timothy C. and Holian, Brad Lee and Lomdahl, Peter S. and Ravelo, Ramon},
abstractNote = {We use multimillion-atom molecular dynamics simulations to study shock wave propagation in fcc crystals. As shown recently, shock waves along the <100> direction form intersecting stacking faults by slippage along {l_brace}111{r_brace} close-packed planes at sufficiently high shock strengths. We find even more interesting behavior of shocks propagating in other low-index directions: for the <111> case, an elastic precursor separates the shock front from the slipped (plastic) region. Shock waves along the <110> direction generate a leading solitary wave train, followed (at sufficiently high shock speeds) by an elastic precursor, and then a region of complex plastic deformation. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.},
doi = {10.1103/PhysRevLett.84.5351},
journal = {Physical Review Letters},
issn = {0031-9007},
number = 23,
volume = 84,
place = {United States},
year = {2000},
month = {6}
}