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Title: High resolution computed tomography and MRI for monitoring lung tumor growth in mice undergoing radioimmunotherapy: Correlation with histology

Abstract

A model lung tumor system has been developed in mice for the evaluation of vascular targeted radioimmunotherapy. In this model, EMT-6 mammary carcinoma tumors growing in the lung are treated with {sup 213}Bi, an alpha particle emitter, which is targeted to lung blood vessels using a monoclonal antibody. Smaller tumors (<100 {mu}m in diameter) are cured, but larger tumors undergo a period of regression and then regrow and ultimately prove lethal. The goal of this work was to determine if external imaging with MRI or CT could be used routinely to monitor the growth/ regression of lung tumors in live mice. To attempt to evaluate individual tumors in vivo, animals were initially imaged with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). High resolution MRI images could be obtained only after sacrifice when lungs were not moving. In contrast, high resolution computed tomography (CT) produced evaluable images from anesthetized animals. Serial CT images (up to 5/animal) were collected over a 17 day period of tumor growth and treatment. When tumored animals became moribund, animals were sacrificed and lungs were inflated with fixative, embedded in paraffin, and then sectioned serially to compare the detection of tumors by high resolution CT with detection by histology. CTmore » proved most useful in detecting lung tumors located in the hilar area and least useful in detecting serosal surface and anterior lobe tumor foci. Overall, CT images of live animals revealed tumors in {approx}2/3 of cases detected in histologic serial sections when relatively few tumors were present per lung. Detection of lesions and their resolution post therapy were complicated due to residual hemorrhagic, regressing tumor nodules and the development of lung edema both of which appeared as high density areas in the CT scans. We conclude that the microCT method used could identify some lung tumors as small as 100 {mu}m in diameter; however, no concrete evaluation of therapy induced regression of the tumors could be made with CT analyses alone. (c) 2000 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [3];  [3];  [2]
  1. Division of Life Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6101 (United States)
  2. Division of Instruments and Controls, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6006 (United States)
  3. Department of Chemistry, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37920 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20216381
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Medical Physics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 27; Journal Issue: 5; Other Information: PBD: May 2000; Journal ID: ISSN 0094-2405
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; HISTOLOGY; RADIOIMMUNOTHERAPY; NMR IMAGING; MICE; TUMOR CELLS; LUNGS; BISMUTH 213; ALPHA PARTICLES; IN VIVO; EXPERIMENTAL DATA

Citation Formats

Kennel, Stephen J., Davis, Ila A., Branning, John, Pan, Hongjun, Kabalka, George W., and Paulus, Michael J. High resolution computed tomography and MRI for monitoring lung tumor growth in mice undergoing radioimmunotherapy: Correlation with histology. United States: N. p., 2000. Web. doi:10.1118/1.598974.
Kennel, Stephen J., Davis, Ila A., Branning, John, Pan, Hongjun, Kabalka, George W., & Paulus, Michael J. High resolution computed tomography and MRI for monitoring lung tumor growth in mice undergoing radioimmunotherapy: Correlation with histology. United States. doi:10.1118/1.598974.
Kennel, Stephen J., Davis, Ila A., Branning, John, Pan, Hongjun, Kabalka, George W., and Paulus, Michael J. Mon . "High resolution computed tomography and MRI for monitoring lung tumor growth in mice undergoing radioimmunotherapy: Correlation with histology". United States. doi:10.1118/1.598974.
@article{osti_20216381,
title = {High resolution computed tomography and MRI for monitoring lung tumor growth in mice undergoing radioimmunotherapy: Correlation with histology},
author = {Kennel, Stephen J. and Davis, Ila A. and Branning, John and Pan, Hongjun and Kabalka, George W. and Paulus, Michael J.},
abstractNote = {A model lung tumor system has been developed in mice for the evaluation of vascular targeted radioimmunotherapy. In this model, EMT-6 mammary carcinoma tumors growing in the lung are treated with {sup 213}Bi, an alpha particle emitter, which is targeted to lung blood vessels using a monoclonal antibody. Smaller tumors (<100 {mu}m in diameter) are cured, but larger tumors undergo a period of regression and then regrow and ultimately prove lethal. The goal of this work was to determine if external imaging with MRI or CT could be used routinely to monitor the growth/ regression of lung tumors in live mice. To attempt to evaluate individual tumors in vivo, animals were initially imaged with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). High resolution MRI images could be obtained only after sacrifice when lungs were not moving. In contrast, high resolution computed tomography (CT) produced evaluable images from anesthetized animals. Serial CT images (up to 5/animal) were collected over a 17 day period of tumor growth and treatment. When tumored animals became moribund, animals were sacrificed and lungs were inflated with fixative, embedded in paraffin, and then sectioned serially to compare the detection of tumors by high resolution CT with detection by histology. CT proved most useful in detecting lung tumors located in the hilar area and least useful in detecting serosal surface and anterior lobe tumor foci. Overall, CT images of live animals revealed tumors in {approx}2/3 of cases detected in histologic serial sections when relatively few tumors were present per lung. Detection of lesions and their resolution post therapy were complicated due to residual hemorrhagic, regressing tumor nodules and the development of lung edema both of which appeared as high density areas in the CT scans. We conclude that the microCT method used could identify some lung tumors as small as 100 {mu}m in diameter; however, no concrete evaluation of therapy induced regression of the tumors could be made with CT analyses alone. (c) 2000 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.},
doi = {10.1118/1.598974},
journal = {Medical Physics},
issn = {0094-2405},
number = 5,
volume = 27,
place = {United States},
year = {2000},
month = {5}
}