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Title: Imaging mechanisms of force detected FMR microscopy

Abstract

We demonstrate spatial resolution of ferromagnetic resonance in a microscopic sample of YIG using ferromagnetic resonance force microscopy (FMRFM). Measurements were performed on a small single crystal YIG film grown on a GGG substrate, roughly rectangular in shape 20 {mu}mx{approx}150 {mu}m and 3 {mu}m thick. The perpendicular and parallel force geometries of FMRFM, in conjunction with an external bias field both parallel and perpendicular to the film, were used to scan the sample. This enabled the detection of strong signals, even at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. The fundamental and higher-order magnetostatic modes were observed to have 26-29 Gauss separation. The intensity of these modes exhibited spatial variation as the magnetic tip was scanned over the sample, and this behavior is qualitatively explained by DE theory. An improved fabrication method for magnet on cantilever was employed, which yielded a spatial resolution of 15 {mu}m. These results demonstrate the potential of FMRFM for investigating the spatial dependence of ferromagnetic resonance, and for studying the anisotropy fields and exchange coupling effects within multilayer films and small magnetic systems. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [1];  [3];  [1]
  1. Condensed Matter Physics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)
  2. Department of Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)
  3. Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20216270
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Journal of Applied Physics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 87; Journal Issue: 9; Other Information: PBD: 1 May 2000; Journal ID: ISSN 0021-8979
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; MICROSCOPY; FERROMAGNETIC RESONANCE; GARNETS; IMAGES; ANISOTROPY; COUPLING; THIN FILMS; EXPERIMENTAL DATA

Citation Formats

Midzor, M. M., Wigen, P. E., Pelekhov, D., Chen, W., Hammel, P. C., and Roukes, M. L. Imaging mechanisms of force detected FMR microscopy. United States: N. p., 2000. Web. doi:10.1063/1.372748.
Midzor, M. M., Wigen, P. E., Pelekhov, D., Chen, W., Hammel, P. C., & Roukes, M. L. Imaging mechanisms of force detected FMR microscopy. United States. doi:10.1063/1.372748.
Midzor, M. M., Wigen, P. E., Pelekhov, D., Chen, W., Hammel, P. C., and Roukes, M. L. Mon . "Imaging mechanisms of force detected FMR microscopy". United States. doi:10.1063/1.372748.
@article{osti_20216270,
title = {Imaging mechanisms of force detected FMR microscopy},
author = {Midzor, M. M. and Wigen, P. E. and Pelekhov, D. and Chen, W. and Hammel, P. C. and Roukes, M. L.},
abstractNote = {We demonstrate spatial resolution of ferromagnetic resonance in a microscopic sample of YIG using ferromagnetic resonance force microscopy (FMRFM). Measurements were performed on a small single crystal YIG film grown on a GGG substrate, roughly rectangular in shape 20 {mu}mx{approx}150 {mu}m and 3 {mu}m thick. The perpendicular and parallel force geometries of FMRFM, in conjunction with an external bias field both parallel and perpendicular to the film, were used to scan the sample. This enabled the detection of strong signals, even at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. The fundamental and higher-order magnetostatic modes were observed to have 26-29 Gauss separation. The intensity of these modes exhibited spatial variation as the magnetic tip was scanned over the sample, and this behavior is qualitatively explained by DE theory. An improved fabrication method for magnet on cantilever was employed, which yielded a spatial resolution of 15 {mu}m. These results demonstrate the potential of FMRFM for investigating the spatial dependence of ferromagnetic resonance, and for studying the anisotropy fields and exchange coupling effects within multilayer films and small magnetic systems. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.},
doi = {10.1063/1.372748},
journal = {Journal of Applied Physics},
issn = {0021-8979},
number = 9,
volume = 87,
place = {United States},
year = {2000},
month = {5}
}