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Title: Exploding aluminum wire expansion rate with 1-4.5 kA per wire

Abstract

X-ray backlighter images (radiographs) of current-induced explosions of 12.7-25 {mu}m diam Al wires have been used to determine the expansion rate and internal structure of the dense wire cores. The current rises to 1-4.5 kA per wire in 350 ns, but voltage and current measurements show that the energy driving the explosion is deposited resistively during the first 40-50 ns, when the current is only a few hundred amperes per wire. A voltage collapse then occurs as a result of plasma formation around the wire, effectively terminating the energy deposition in the wire core. High-resolution radiographs obtained over the next 150-200 ns show the expanding wire cores to have significant axial stratification and foamlike structures with {approx}10 {mu}m scale lengths over most of the wire length before they disappear in the expansion process. The expansion rate of the portion of the wire cores that is dense enough to be detected by radiography is 1.4-2 {mu}m/ns commencing approximately 25 ns after the moment of the voltage collapse. (The sensitivity limit is equivalent to 0.2 {mu}m of solid density Al.) By 250 ns after the start of the current pulse, the detectable wire core diameter is 250 {mu}m, but it contains onlymore » about 30% of the initial wire material. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Laboratory of Plasma Studies, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20216038
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Physics of Plasmas
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 7; Journal Issue: 5; Other Information: PBD: May 2000; Journal ID: ISSN 1070-664X
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; EXPLODING WIRES; EXPANSION; PLASMA DIAGNOSTICS; ALUMINIUM; PLASMA PRODUCTION; THEORETICAL DATA

Citation Formats

Sinars, D. B., Shelkovenko, T. A., Pikuz, S. A., Greenly, J. B., and Hammer, D. A. Exploding aluminum wire expansion rate with 1-4.5 kA per wire. United States: N. p., 2000. Web. doi:10.1063/1.873975.
Sinars, D. B., Shelkovenko, T. A., Pikuz, S. A., Greenly, J. B., & Hammer, D. A. Exploding aluminum wire expansion rate with 1-4.5 kA per wire. United States. doi:10.1063/1.873975.
Sinars, D. B., Shelkovenko, T. A., Pikuz, S. A., Greenly, J. B., and Hammer, D. A. Mon . "Exploding aluminum wire expansion rate with 1-4.5 kA per wire". United States. doi:10.1063/1.873975.
@article{osti_20216038,
title = {Exploding aluminum wire expansion rate with 1-4.5 kA per wire},
author = {Sinars, D. B. and Shelkovenko, T. A. and Pikuz, S. A. and Greenly, J. B. and Hammer, D. A.},
abstractNote = {X-ray backlighter images (radiographs) of current-induced explosions of 12.7-25 {mu}m diam Al wires have been used to determine the expansion rate and internal structure of the dense wire cores. The current rises to 1-4.5 kA per wire in 350 ns, but voltage and current measurements show that the energy driving the explosion is deposited resistively during the first 40-50 ns, when the current is only a few hundred amperes per wire. A voltage collapse then occurs as a result of plasma formation around the wire, effectively terminating the energy deposition in the wire core. High-resolution radiographs obtained over the next 150-200 ns show the expanding wire cores to have significant axial stratification and foamlike structures with {approx}10 {mu}m scale lengths over most of the wire length before they disappear in the expansion process. The expansion rate of the portion of the wire cores that is dense enough to be detected by radiography is 1.4-2 {mu}m/ns commencing approximately 25 ns after the moment of the voltage collapse. (The sensitivity limit is equivalent to 0.2 {mu}m of solid density Al.) By 250 ns after the start of the current pulse, the detectable wire core diameter is 250 {mu}m, but it contains only about 30% of the initial wire material. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.},
doi = {10.1063/1.873975},
journal = {Physics of Plasmas},
issn = {1070-664X},
number = 5,
volume = 7,
place = {United States},
year = {2000},
month = {5}
}