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Title: Source apportionment of wintertime gas-phase and particle-phase air pollutants using organic compounds as tracers

Abstract

Two chemical mass balance receptor models are developed which can determine the source contributions to atmospheric pollutant concentrations using organic compounds as tracers. The first model uses particle-phase organic compounds to apportion the primary source contribution to atmospheric fine particulate organic carbon concentrations and fine particle mass concentrations. The second receptor model simultaneously uses both volatile gas-phase hydrocarbon and particle-phase organic compounds as tracers to determine source contributions to non-methane organic gases in the atmosphere. Both models are applied to data collected in California's San Joaquin Valley during two severe wintertime air pollution episodes. Source contributions to fine particle air quality are calculated for two urban sites, Fresno and Bakersfield, and one background site, Kern Wildlife Refuge. Primary particle emissions from hardwood combustion, softwood combustion, diesel engines, meat cooking, and gasoline-powered motor vehicles contribute on average 79% of the airborne fine particle organic compound mass at the urban sites during both episodes with smaller but still measurable contributions from fine particle road dust and natural gas combustion aerosol. Anthropogenic primary particle sources contribute less than 10% of the fine particle mass concentration at the background site. The combined gas-phase and particle-phase organic compound receptor model shows that gasoline-powered motor vehiclemore » exhaust and gasoline vapors are the largest contributors to nonmethane organic gases concentrations followed by natural gas leakage. Smaller but statistically significant contributions to organic vapors from wood combustion, meat cooking, and diesel exhaust also are quantified.« less

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (US)
OSTI Identifier:
20080524
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Environmental Science and Technology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 34; Journal Issue: 9; Other Information: PBD: 1 May 2000; Journal ID: ISSN 0013-936X
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; AIR POLLUTION; POLLUTION SOURCES; SEASONAL VARIATIONS; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; PARTICULATES; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

Citation Formats

Schauer, J.J., and Cass, G.R. Source apportionment of wintertime gas-phase and particle-phase air pollutants using organic compounds as tracers. United States: N. p., 2000. Web. doi:10.1021/es981312t.
Schauer, J.J., & Cass, G.R. Source apportionment of wintertime gas-phase and particle-phase air pollutants using organic compounds as tracers. United States. doi:10.1021/es981312t.
Schauer, J.J., and Cass, G.R. Mon . "Source apportionment of wintertime gas-phase and particle-phase air pollutants using organic compounds as tracers". United States. doi:10.1021/es981312t.
@article{osti_20080524,
title = {Source apportionment of wintertime gas-phase and particle-phase air pollutants using organic compounds as tracers},
author = {Schauer, J.J. and Cass, G.R.},
abstractNote = {Two chemical mass balance receptor models are developed which can determine the source contributions to atmospheric pollutant concentrations using organic compounds as tracers. The first model uses particle-phase organic compounds to apportion the primary source contribution to atmospheric fine particulate organic carbon concentrations and fine particle mass concentrations. The second receptor model simultaneously uses both volatile gas-phase hydrocarbon and particle-phase organic compounds as tracers to determine source contributions to non-methane organic gases in the atmosphere. Both models are applied to data collected in California's San Joaquin Valley during two severe wintertime air pollution episodes. Source contributions to fine particle air quality are calculated for two urban sites, Fresno and Bakersfield, and one background site, Kern Wildlife Refuge. Primary particle emissions from hardwood combustion, softwood combustion, diesel engines, meat cooking, and gasoline-powered motor vehicles contribute on average 79% of the airborne fine particle organic compound mass at the urban sites during both episodes with smaller but still measurable contributions from fine particle road dust and natural gas combustion aerosol. Anthropogenic primary particle sources contribute less than 10% of the fine particle mass concentration at the background site. The combined gas-phase and particle-phase organic compound receptor model shows that gasoline-powered motor vehicle exhaust and gasoline vapors are the largest contributors to nonmethane organic gases concentrations followed by natural gas leakage. Smaller but statistically significant contributions to organic vapors from wood combustion, meat cooking, and diesel exhaust also are quantified.},
doi = {10.1021/es981312t},
journal = {Environmental Science and Technology},
issn = {0013-936X},
number = 9,
volume = 34,
place = {United States},
year = {2000},
month = {5}
}