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Title: Biofiltration of air contaminated by styrene: Effect of nitrogen supply, gas flow rate, and inlet concentration

Abstract

The biofiltration process is a promising technology for the treatment of dilute styrene emissions in air. The efficiency of this process is however strongly dependent upon various operational parameters such as the filter bed characteristics, nutrient supplies, input contaminant concentrations, and gas flow rates. The biofiltration of air containing styrene vapors was therefore investigated, employing a novel biomass filter material, in two identical but separate laboratory scale biofiltration units (units 1 and 2), both biofilters being initially inoculated with a microbial consortium. Each biofilter was irrigated with a nutrient solution supplying nitrogen in one of two forms; i.e., mainly as ammonia for unit 1 and exclusively as nitrate for unit 2. The experimental results have revealed that greater styrene elimination rates are achieved in the biofilter supplied with ammonia as the major nitrogen source in comparison to the lesser elimination performance obtained with the nitrate provided biofilter. However, in achieving the high styrene removal rates in the ammonia supplied biofilter, the excess of biomass accumulates on the filtering pellets and causes progressive clogging of the filter media. Furthermore, the effectiveness of nitrate supply as the sole nitrogen nutrient form, on reducing or controlling the biomass accumulation in the filter mediamore » in comparison to ammonia, could not be satisfactorily demonstrated because the two biofilters operated with very different styrene elimination capacities. The monitoring of the carbon dioxide concentration profile through both biofilters revealed that the ratio of carbon dioxide produced to the styrene removed was approximately 3/1, which confirms the complete biodegradation of removed styrene, given that some of the organic carbon consumed is also used for the microbial growth. The effects of the most important design parameters, namely styrene input concentrations and gas flow rates, were investigated for each nutrient solution.« less

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. de Sherbrooke, Quebec (CA)
OSTI Identifier:
20080518
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Environmental Science and Technology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 34; Journal Issue: 9; Other Information: PBD: 1 May 2000; Journal ID: ISSN 0013-936X
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; INDUSTRIAL WASTES; WASTE PROCESSING; BIODEGRADATION; STYRENE; AIR POLLUTION ABATEMENT; NITRATES; CARBON DIOXIDE; GAS FLOW

Citation Formats

Jorio, H., Bibeau, L., and Heitz, M. Biofiltration of air contaminated by styrene: Effect of nitrogen supply, gas flow rate, and inlet concentration. United States: N. p., 2000. Web. doi:10.1021/es990911c.
Jorio, H., Bibeau, L., & Heitz, M. Biofiltration of air contaminated by styrene: Effect of nitrogen supply, gas flow rate, and inlet concentration. United States. doi:10.1021/es990911c.
Jorio, H., Bibeau, L., and Heitz, M. Mon . "Biofiltration of air contaminated by styrene: Effect of nitrogen supply, gas flow rate, and inlet concentration". United States. doi:10.1021/es990911c.
@article{osti_20080518,
title = {Biofiltration of air contaminated by styrene: Effect of nitrogen supply, gas flow rate, and inlet concentration},
author = {Jorio, H. and Bibeau, L. and Heitz, M.},
abstractNote = {The biofiltration process is a promising technology for the treatment of dilute styrene emissions in air. The efficiency of this process is however strongly dependent upon various operational parameters such as the filter bed characteristics, nutrient supplies, input contaminant concentrations, and gas flow rates. The biofiltration of air containing styrene vapors was therefore investigated, employing a novel biomass filter material, in two identical but separate laboratory scale biofiltration units (units 1 and 2), both biofilters being initially inoculated with a microbial consortium. Each biofilter was irrigated with a nutrient solution supplying nitrogen in one of two forms; i.e., mainly as ammonia for unit 1 and exclusively as nitrate for unit 2. The experimental results have revealed that greater styrene elimination rates are achieved in the biofilter supplied with ammonia as the major nitrogen source in comparison to the lesser elimination performance obtained with the nitrate provided biofilter. However, in achieving the high styrene removal rates in the ammonia supplied biofilter, the excess of biomass accumulates on the filtering pellets and causes progressive clogging of the filter media. Furthermore, the effectiveness of nitrate supply as the sole nitrogen nutrient form, on reducing or controlling the biomass accumulation in the filter media in comparison to ammonia, could not be satisfactorily demonstrated because the two biofilters operated with very different styrene elimination capacities. The monitoring of the carbon dioxide concentration profile through both biofilters revealed that the ratio of carbon dioxide produced to the styrene removed was approximately 3/1, which confirms the complete biodegradation of removed styrene, given that some of the organic carbon consumed is also used for the microbial growth. The effects of the most important design parameters, namely styrene input concentrations and gas flow rates, were investigated for each nutrient solution.},
doi = {10.1021/es990911c},
journal = {Environmental Science and Technology},
issn = {0013-936X},
number = 9,
volume = 34,
place = {United States},
year = {2000},
month = {5}
}