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Title: Fine particulate matter (PM) and organic speciation of fireplace emissions

Abstract

This paper presents a summary of fireplace particle size and organic speciation data gathered to date in an ongoing project. Tests are being conducted in a residential wood combustion (RWC) laboratory on three factory-built fireplaces. RWC wood smoke particles <10 {micro}m (PM10) consist primarily of a mixture of organic compounds that have condensed into droplets; therefore, the size distribution and total mass are influenced by temperature of the sample during its collection. During the series 1 tests (15 tests), the dilution tunnel used to cool and dilute the stack gases gave an average mixed gas temperature of 47.3 C and an average dilution ration of 4.3. Averages for the PM2.5 (particles <2.5 {micro}m) and PM10 fractions were 74 and 84%, respectively. For the series 2 tests, the dilution tunnel was modified, reducing the average mixed gas temperatures to 33.8 C and increasing the average dilution ratio to 11.0 in tests completed to date. PM2.5 and PM10 fractions were 83 and 91%, respectively. Since typical winter-time mixed gas temperatures would usually be less than 10 C, these size fraction results probably represent the lower bound; the PM10 and PM2.5 size fraction results might be higher at typical winter temperatures. The particlesmore » collected on the first stage were light gray and appeared to include inorganic ash. Particles collected on the remainder of the stages were black and appeared to be condensed organics because there was noticeable lateral bleeding of the collected materials into the filter substrate. Total particulate emission rates ranged from 10.3 to 58.4 g/h; corresponding emission factors ranged from 3.3 to 14.9 g/kg of dry wood burned. A wide range of Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Method 8270 semivolatile organic compounds were found in the emissions; of the 17 target compounds quantified, major constituents are phenol, 2-methylphenol, 4-methylphenol, 2,4-dimethylphenol, and naphthalene.« less

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (US)
OSTI Identifier:
20080505
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Environmental Science and Technology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 34; Journal Issue: 9; Other Information: PBD: 1 May 2000; Journal ID: ISSN 0013-936X
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS; PARTICULATES; PHENOLS; NAPHTHALENE; EMISSION; PARTICLE SIZE; WOOD FUELS; COMBUSTION PRODUCTS; AIR POLLUTION MONITORING

Citation Formats

Purvis, C.R., McCrillis, R.C., and Kariher, P.H. Fine particulate matter (PM) and organic speciation of fireplace emissions. United States: N. p., 2000. Web. doi:10.1021/es981006f.
Purvis, C.R., McCrillis, R.C., & Kariher, P.H. Fine particulate matter (PM) and organic speciation of fireplace emissions. United States. doi:10.1021/es981006f.
Purvis, C.R., McCrillis, R.C., and Kariher, P.H. Mon . "Fine particulate matter (PM) and organic speciation of fireplace emissions". United States. doi:10.1021/es981006f.
@article{osti_20080505,
title = {Fine particulate matter (PM) and organic speciation of fireplace emissions},
author = {Purvis, C.R. and McCrillis, R.C. and Kariher, P.H.},
abstractNote = {This paper presents a summary of fireplace particle size and organic speciation data gathered to date in an ongoing project. Tests are being conducted in a residential wood combustion (RWC) laboratory on three factory-built fireplaces. RWC wood smoke particles <10 {micro}m (PM10) consist primarily of a mixture of organic compounds that have condensed into droplets; therefore, the size distribution and total mass are influenced by temperature of the sample during its collection. During the series 1 tests (15 tests), the dilution tunnel used to cool and dilute the stack gases gave an average mixed gas temperature of 47.3 C and an average dilution ration of 4.3. Averages for the PM2.5 (particles <2.5 {micro}m) and PM10 fractions were 74 and 84%, respectively. For the series 2 tests, the dilution tunnel was modified, reducing the average mixed gas temperatures to 33.8 C and increasing the average dilution ratio to 11.0 in tests completed to date. PM2.5 and PM10 fractions were 83 and 91%, respectively. Since typical winter-time mixed gas temperatures would usually be less than 10 C, these size fraction results probably represent the lower bound; the PM10 and PM2.5 size fraction results might be higher at typical winter temperatures. The particles collected on the first stage were light gray and appeared to include inorganic ash. Particles collected on the remainder of the stages were black and appeared to be condensed organics because there was noticeable lateral bleeding of the collected materials into the filter substrate. Total particulate emission rates ranged from 10.3 to 58.4 g/h; corresponding emission factors ranged from 3.3 to 14.9 g/kg of dry wood burned. A wide range of Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Method 8270 semivolatile organic compounds were found in the emissions; of the 17 target compounds quantified, major constituents are phenol, 2-methylphenol, 4-methylphenol, 2,4-dimethylphenol, and naphthalene.},
doi = {10.1021/es981006f},
journal = {Environmental Science and Technology},
issn = {0013-936X},
number = 9,
volume = 34,
place = {United States},
year = {2000},
month = {5}
}