skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Bioavailability of soil-sorbed biphenyl to bacteria

Abstract

Limited bioavailability of organic pollutants in soil may be a detriment to the successful application of bioremediation. The availability of soil-sorbed biphenyl to two biphenyl-degrading bacteria, Pseudomonas putida P106 and Rhodococcus erythropolis NY05, was assessed using a kinetic mineralization assay. Biphenyl was aged in four soils of different organic carbon (OC) contents for up to 274 days. With a biphenyl-soil contact time of 24 h, the initial mineralization rates (IMRs) ranged from 2.6 to 3.5 {micro}g{sm_bullet}L{sup {minus}1}{sm_bullet}min{sup {minus}1} for strain P106 and from 3.8 to 0.92 {micro}g{sm_bullet}L{sup {minus}1}{sm_bullet}min{sup {minus}1} for strain NY05. These IMRs were higher than those of soil-free controls and those predicted by a coupled desorption/biodegradation model, suggesting both strains of bacteria could access soil-sorbed biphenyl. For strain P106, biphenyl mineralization curves in slurries of four different soils were nearly coincident with those in soil-free systems containing the same total mass of biphenyl. This strain appeared to have immediate and complete access to the pool of sorbed biphenyl. The extent of bioavailability of soil-sorbed biphenyl decreased with increased aging. The decrease in availability was most pronounced within the first 80 days. The effect of soil organic matter content on bioavailability showed different trends for the two organisms.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (US)
OSTI Identifier:
20080458
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Environmental Science and Technology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 34; Journal Issue: 10; Other Information: PBD: 15 May 2000; Journal ID: ISSN 0013-936X
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; SOILS; LAND POLLUTION; BIOLOGICAL AVAILABILITY; BIPHENYL; PSEUDOMONAS; RHODOCOCCUS; BIODEGRADATION; REMEDIAL ACTION

Citation Formats

Feng, Y., Park, J.H., Voice, T.C., and Boyd, S.A. Bioavailability of soil-sorbed biphenyl to bacteria. United States: N. p., 2000. Web. doi:10.1021/es991165e.
Feng, Y., Park, J.H., Voice, T.C., & Boyd, S.A. Bioavailability of soil-sorbed biphenyl to bacteria. United States. doi:10.1021/es991165e.
Feng, Y., Park, J.H., Voice, T.C., and Boyd, S.A. Mon . "Bioavailability of soil-sorbed biphenyl to bacteria". United States. doi:10.1021/es991165e.
@article{osti_20080458,
title = {Bioavailability of soil-sorbed biphenyl to bacteria},
author = {Feng, Y. and Park, J.H. and Voice, T.C. and Boyd, S.A.},
abstractNote = {Limited bioavailability of organic pollutants in soil may be a detriment to the successful application of bioremediation. The availability of soil-sorbed biphenyl to two biphenyl-degrading bacteria, Pseudomonas putida P106 and Rhodococcus erythropolis NY05, was assessed using a kinetic mineralization assay. Biphenyl was aged in four soils of different organic carbon (OC) contents for up to 274 days. With a biphenyl-soil contact time of 24 h, the initial mineralization rates (IMRs) ranged from 2.6 to 3.5 {micro}g{sm_bullet}L{sup {minus}1}{sm_bullet}min{sup {minus}1} for strain P106 and from 3.8 to 0.92 {micro}g{sm_bullet}L{sup {minus}1}{sm_bullet}min{sup {minus}1} for strain NY05. These IMRs were higher than those of soil-free controls and those predicted by a coupled desorption/biodegradation model, suggesting both strains of bacteria could access soil-sorbed biphenyl. For strain P106, biphenyl mineralization curves in slurries of four different soils were nearly coincident with those in soil-free systems containing the same total mass of biphenyl. This strain appeared to have immediate and complete access to the pool of sorbed biphenyl. The extent of bioavailability of soil-sorbed biphenyl decreased with increased aging. The decrease in availability was most pronounced within the first 80 days. The effect of soil organic matter content on bioavailability showed different trends for the two organisms.},
doi = {10.1021/es991165e},
journal = {Environmental Science and Technology},
issn = {0013-936X},
number = 10,
volume = 34,
place = {United States},
year = {2000},
month = {5}
}