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Title: Zinc speciation in a contaminated aquatic environment: Characterization of environmental particles by analytical electron microscopy

Abstract

Analytical electron microscopy (AEM) was used to characterize individual aquatic particles in a lake that has been contaminated by zinc smelting operations. Samples were collected from the sediments and the water column of the lake along a gradient of metal contamination. The samples were prepared to preserve their aqueous nature, and thin sections were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Zinc bearing particles were characterized by different morphologies ranging from near spherical large colloids to small grains either intimately associated with biological templates of present as separate amorphous entities. Elemental associations were determined for each individual particle by X-ray energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS). These analyses revealed the pervasive presence of Zn through the aquatic environment and its intimate combination with Fe and P in biotic structures. The association of Zn and P was most prevalent close to the source of contamination, whereas afar Zn was primarily found in sulfur moieties. Cluster analyses, performed on four different sets of EDS measurements, exemplify the fate of Zn in the lake by quantifying changes in elemental associations.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (US)
OSTI Identifier:
20080454
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Environmental Science and Technology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 34; Journal Issue: 10; Other Information: PBD: 15 May 2000; Journal ID: ISSN 0013-936X
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; ZINC; WATER POLLUTION; ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; LAKES; ECOLOGICAL CONCENTRATION; PHOSPHORUS

Citation Formats

Webb, S.M., Leppard, G.G., and Gaillard, J.F. Zinc speciation in a contaminated aquatic environment: Characterization of environmental particles by analytical electron microscopy. United States: N. p., 2000. Web. doi:10.1021/es991167z.
Webb, S.M., Leppard, G.G., & Gaillard, J.F. Zinc speciation in a contaminated aquatic environment: Characterization of environmental particles by analytical electron microscopy. United States. doi:10.1021/es991167z.
Webb, S.M., Leppard, G.G., and Gaillard, J.F. Mon . "Zinc speciation in a contaminated aquatic environment: Characterization of environmental particles by analytical electron microscopy". United States. doi:10.1021/es991167z.
@article{osti_20080454,
title = {Zinc speciation in a contaminated aquatic environment: Characterization of environmental particles by analytical electron microscopy},
author = {Webb, S.M. and Leppard, G.G. and Gaillard, J.F.},
abstractNote = {Analytical electron microscopy (AEM) was used to characterize individual aquatic particles in a lake that has been contaminated by zinc smelting operations. Samples were collected from the sediments and the water column of the lake along a gradient of metal contamination. The samples were prepared to preserve their aqueous nature, and thin sections were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Zinc bearing particles were characterized by different morphologies ranging from near spherical large colloids to small grains either intimately associated with biological templates of present as separate amorphous entities. Elemental associations were determined for each individual particle by X-ray energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS). These analyses revealed the pervasive presence of Zn through the aquatic environment and its intimate combination with Fe and P in biotic structures. The association of Zn and P was most prevalent close to the source of contamination, whereas afar Zn was primarily found in sulfur moieties. Cluster analyses, performed on four different sets of EDS measurements, exemplify the fate of Zn in the lake by quantifying changes in elemental associations.},
doi = {10.1021/es991167z},
journal = {Environmental Science and Technology},
issn = {0013-936X},
number = 10,
volume = 34,
place = {United States},
year = {2000},
month = {5}
}