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Title: Transport of mercury from a cultivated field during snowmelt

Abstract

Total mercury (THg) was determined in snow, overland snowmelt runoff, and soil from a small-cultivated catchment. Total mercury concentrations in snow were low [mean concentration = 1.04 ng/L (liquid basis); n = 9; CV = 23%], while THg concentrations in snow-melt runoff were much higher, ranging from 16 to 22 ng/L. The THg concentration of suspended particulates in the runoff was much higher than observed surface soil THg concentrations (mean concentration = 26 {micro}g/kg; n = 6; CV = 16%). Particle size analysis showed the clay content of the runoff sediment was approximately twice that of the bulk surficial soil. These results suggest that snowmelt runoff preferentially mobilizes very fine soil particles (clays) that have a THg concentration that is greater than that of the bulk surficial soil. The total mass of THg in the snow pack prior to snowmelt was 1.26 mg, and that delivered from the catchment during the snowmelt event was 0.36 mg. This suggests there was a net accumulation of THg in the catchment soil over the winter. Soil erosion and transport are the primary mechanisms that control THg delivery from this catchment during snowmelt events.

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Metropolitan Council Environmental Services, St. Paul, MN (US)
OSTI Identifier:
20080430
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Journal of Environmental Quality
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 29; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: PBD: May-Jun 2000; Journal ID: ISSN 0047-2425
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; MERCURY; ENVIRONMENTAL TRANSPORT; SOILS; SNOW; MONITORING; MELTING

Citation Formats

Balogh, S.J., Meyer, M.L., Hansen, N.C., Moncrief, J.F., and Gupta, S.C. Transport of mercury from a cultivated field during snowmelt. United States: N. p., 2000. Web. doi:10.2134/jeq2000.00472425002900030024x.
Balogh, S.J., Meyer, M.L., Hansen, N.C., Moncrief, J.F., & Gupta, S.C. Transport of mercury from a cultivated field during snowmelt. United States. doi:10.2134/jeq2000.00472425002900030024x.
Balogh, S.J., Meyer, M.L., Hansen, N.C., Moncrief, J.F., and Gupta, S.C. Thu . "Transport of mercury from a cultivated field during snowmelt". United States. doi:10.2134/jeq2000.00472425002900030024x.
@article{osti_20080430,
title = {Transport of mercury from a cultivated field during snowmelt},
author = {Balogh, S.J. and Meyer, M.L. and Hansen, N.C. and Moncrief, J.F. and Gupta, S.C.},
abstractNote = {Total mercury (THg) was determined in snow, overland snowmelt runoff, and soil from a small-cultivated catchment. Total mercury concentrations in snow were low [mean concentration = 1.04 ng/L (liquid basis); n = 9; CV = 23%], while THg concentrations in snow-melt runoff were much higher, ranging from 16 to 22 ng/L. The THg concentration of suspended particulates in the runoff was much higher than observed surface soil THg concentrations (mean concentration = 26 {micro}g/kg; n = 6; CV = 16%). Particle size analysis showed the clay content of the runoff sediment was approximately twice that of the bulk surficial soil. These results suggest that snowmelt runoff preferentially mobilizes very fine soil particles (clays) that have a THg concentration that is greater than that of the bulk surficial soil. The total mass of THg in the snow pack prior to snowmelt was 1.26 mg, and that delivered from the catchment during the snowmelt event was 0.36 mg. This suggests there was a net accumulation of THg in the catchment soil over the winter. Soil erosion and transport are the primary mechanisms that control THg delivery from this catchment during snowmelt events.},
doi = {10.2134/jeq2000.00472425002900030024x},
journal = {Journal of Environmental Quality},
issn = {0047-2425},
number = 3,
volume = 29,
place = {United States},
year = {2000},
month = {6}
}