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Title: Hawaiian heat

Abstract

Today, the island's people are still using the sun's energy in their daily tasks. In 1996, Maui Electric Company (MECO) and its sister companies (Hawaiian Electric on the island of Oahu, and Hawaii Electric Light on the island of Hawaii), implemented energy efficiency programs, including the largest solar water heating program in the US. The goal of these energy efficiency programs is to defer the need to build new power plants. With the expiration in 1985 of the Federal and State of Hawaii Energy Tax credits, the solar water heating industry in Hawaii went into a steady decline. During the industry's heyday in the early and mid-80's, approximately 5,000 solar system were being installed each year. Prior to the utilities' promotion of solar water heating in 1996, the number of solar water heaters installed dropped significantly to an average of about 1,200 systems per year. However, in the three years since the inception of the solar water heating program, Maui Electric and its sister companies have installed 10,000 solar water heating systems and have paid out over $10 million in cash incentives to island residents to install solar water heating systems. The utility support of the solar trade industry hasmore » also created nearly 400 jobs and generated about $14.9 million of investments within the state. The story behind these statistics is equally impressive.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Maui Electric Co., Ltd., Kahului, HI (US)
OSTI Identifier:
20080317
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 20080317
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Solar Today
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 14; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: PBD: May-Jun 2000; Journal ID: ISSN 1042-0630
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; SOLAR ARCHITECTURE; SOLAR WATER HEATING; SOLAR WATER HEATERS; HAWAII; HOUSES; CONSTRUCTION; ENERGY CONSERVATION; RESOURCE CONSERVATION

Citation Formats

Wilson, J. Hawaiian heat. United States: N. p., 2000. Web.
Wilson, J. Hawaiian heat. United States.
Wilson, J. Thu . "Hawaiian heat". United States.
@article{osti_20080317,
title = {Hawaiian heat},
author = {Wilson, J.},
abstractNote = {Today, the island's people are still using the sun's energy in their daily tasks. In 1996, Maui Electric Company (MECO) and its sister companies (Hawaiian Electric on the island of Oahu, and Hawaii Electric Light on the island of Hawaii), implemented energy efficiency programs, including the largest solar water heating program in the US. The goal of these energy efficiency programs is to defer the need to build new power plants. With the expiration in 1985 of the Federal and State of Hawaii Energy Tax credits, the solar water heating industry in Hawaii went into a steady decline. During the industry's heyday in the early and mid-80's, approximately 5,000 solar system were being installed each year. Prior to the utilities' promotion of solar water heating in 1996, the number of solar water heaters installed dropped significantly to an average of about 1,200 systems per year. However, in the three years since the inception of the solar water heating program, Maui Electric and its sister companies have installed 10,000 solar water heating systems and have paid out over $10 million in cash incentives to island residents to install solar water heating systems. The utility support of the solar trade industry has also created nearly 400 jobs and generated about $14.9 million of investments within the state. The story behind these statistics is equally impressive.},
doi = {},
journal = {Solar Today},
issn = {1042-0630},
number = 3,
volume = 14,
place = {United States},
year = {2000},
month = {6}
}