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Title: Catalytic degradation of high-density polyethylene on an ultrastable-Y zeolite. Nature of initial polymer reactions, pattern of formation of gas and liquid products, and temperature effects

Abstract

The catalytic degradation of high-density polyethylene (hdPE) over ultrastable Y zeolite in a semibatch reactor was studied at different heating rates and reaction temperatures. Catalytic degradation of the polymer occurred at much lower temperatures than pure thermal degradation. When gel permeation chromatography was used to determine the molar mass distribution, it was found that solid state reactions occur only in the presence of a catalyst. These reactions change the polymer structure well before the formation of significant amounts of volatile products. The pattern of formation of gaseous and liquid products was studied and found to follow the temperature increase. After the system reached its final temperature, the reaction rate of formation of volatile products decreased rapidly. The product range was typically between C{sub 3} and C{sub 15}. Isobutane and isopentane were the main gaseous products. The liquid product fraction was alkane-rich, as alkenes rapidly undergo bimolecular hydrogen transfer reactions to give alkanes as secondary products.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. Coll. London (GB)
OSTI Identifier:
20076072
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Research
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 39; Journal Issue: 5; Other Information: PBD: May 2000; Journal ID: ISSN 0888-5885
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; POLYETHYLENES; DECOMPOSITION; ZEOLITES; CATALYTIC EFFECTS; CHEMICAL REACTION KINETICS; MUNICIPAL WASTES; INDUSTRIAL WASTES; TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE; CHEMICAL REACTION YIELD; RECYCLING

Citation Formats

Manos, G., Garforth, A., and Dwyer, J. Catalytic degradation of high-density polyethylene on an ultrastable-Y zeolite. Nature of initial polymer reactions, pattern of formation of gas and liquid products, and temperature effects. United States: N. p., 2000. Web. doi:10.1021/ie990513i.
Manos, G., Garforth, A., & Dwyer, J. Catalytic degradation of high-density polyethylene on an ultrastable-Y zeolite. Nature of initial polymer reactions, pattern of formation of gas and liquid products, and temperature effects. United States. doi:10.1021/ie990513i.
Manos, G., Garforth, A., and Dwyer, J. Mon . "Catalytic degradation of high-density polyethylene on an ultrastable-Y zeolite. Nature of initial polymer reactions, pattern of formation of gas and liquid products, and temperature effects". United States. doi:10.1021/ie990513i.
@article{osti_20076072,
title = {Catalytic degradation of high-density polyethylene on an ultrastable-Y zeolite. Nature of initial polymer reactions, pattern of formation of gas and liquid products, and temperature effects},
author = {Manos, G. and Garforth, A. and Dwyer, J.},
abstractNote = {The catalytic degradation of high-density polyethylene (hdPE) over ultrastable Y zeolite in a semibatch reactor was studied at different heating rates and reaction temperatures. Catalytic degradation of the polymer occurred at much lower temperatures than pure thermal degradation. When gel permeation chromatography was used to determine the molar mass distribution, it was found that solid state reactions occur only in the presence of a catalyst. These reactions change the polymer structure well before the formation of significant amounts of volatile products. The pattern of formation of gaseous and liquid products was studied and found to follow the temperature increase. After the system reached its final temperature, the reaction rate of formation of volatile products decreased rapidly. The product range was typically between C{sub 3} and C{sub 15}. Isobutane and isopentane were the main gaseous products. The liquid product fraction was alkane-rich, as alkenes rapidly undergo bimolecular hydrogen transfer reactions to give alkanes as secondary products.},
doi = {10.1021/ie990513i},
journal = {Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Research},
issn = {0888-5885},
number = 5,
volume = 39,
place = {United States},
year = {2000},
month = {5}
}