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Title: Drying of solids: The infinite slab condition

Abstract

Fourier's second law was solved using convective boundary conditions without considering the shrinkage of the solid. The solutions for a finite and an infinite slab were compared to determine the dimensions for a slab to be considered as infinite. The solutions obtained for Bi = 0.1 and Bi = 100 correspond to heat and mass transfer-controlled processes, respectively, during drying. The results show that the finite slab cannot be considered as infinite, even for R{sub 2}/R{sub 1} > 20. The relative error obtained when the finite slab was assumed to be infinite was not significant for small Fourier numbers, but it increased as the Fourier number increased; errors were also higher for higher Biot numbers. When the numerical solution of a drying model was obtained for finite and infinite slabs, significant differences in drying kinetics and temperature evolution were observed.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of California, Davis, CA (US)
OSTI Identifier:
20076038
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 20076038
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Drying Technology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 18; Journal Issue: 4-5; Other Information: PBD: Apr-May 2000; Journal ID: ISSN 0737-3937
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; SLABS; DRYING; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; CALCULATION METHODS; ERRORS; ENERGY EFFICIENCY

Citation Formats

Rovedo, C.O., and Viollaz, P.E. Drying of solids: The infinite slab condition. United States: N. p., 2000. Web. doi:10.1080/07373930008917750.
Rovedo, C.O., & Viollaz, P.E. Drying of solids: The infinite slab condition. United States. doi:10.1080/07373930008917750.
Rovedo, C.O., and Viollaz, P.E. Mon . "Drying of solids: The infinite slab condition". United States. doi:10.1080/07373930008917750.
@article{osti_20076038,
title = {Drying of solids: The infinite slab condition},
author = {Rovedo, C.O. and Viollaz, P.E.},
abstractNote = {Fourier's second law was solved using convective boundary conditions without considering the shrinkage of the solid. The solutions for a finite and an infinite slab were compared to determine the dimensions for a slab to be considered as infinite. The solutions obtained for Bi = 0.1 and Bi = 100 correspond to heat and mass transfer-controlled processes, respectively, during drying. The results show that the finite slab cannot be considered as infinite, even for R{sub 2}/R{sub 1} > 20. The relative error obtained when the finite slab was assumed to be infinite was not significant for small Fourier numbers, but it increased as the Fourier number increased; errors were also higher for higher Biot numbers. When the numerical solution of a drying model was obtained for finite and infinite slabs, significant differences in drying kinetics and temperature evolution were observed.},
doi = {10.1080/07373930008917750},
journal = {Drying Technology},
issn = {0737-3937},
number = 4-5,
volume = 18,
place = {United States},
year = {2000},
month = {5}
}