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Title: Effects of precipitates in Cu upon impact fracture: An ultra-high-vacuum study with local probe scanning Auger/electron microscopy

Abstract

In situ fracture under ultra-high vacuum (UHV) conditions of copper-alloys containing copper sulfide precipitates exhibits areas in the form of pits. The wide variety of morphologies depends significantly on the size of the existing precipitate. For large precipitates, the fractured surface reveals loops surrounded by step-terrace like structures with sulfur remaining preferentially on straight ledges as nanometer scale Auger images reveal in comparison with scanning electron images. For smaller precipitates (< 3--4 {micro}m), only well defined facets are formed having an almost uniform distribution of sulfur. Qualitatively the loop and facet formation could be explained due to accommodation of the Cu sulfide to the Cu matrix, leading for small precipitates to facet formation, and for large ones to step-terrace structures. Asymmetry in loop structures could be attributed to asymmetry of precipitate shape, while in some areas plasticity effects are also present. Finally, a comparison with distinctly different behavior in Cu-Bi alloys is made.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Groningen (NL)
OSTI Identifier:
20075949
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Acta Materialia
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 48; Journal Issue: 8; Other Information: PBD: 11 May 2000; Journal ID: ISSN 1359-6454
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; MICROSTRUCTURE; FRACTURE PROPERTIES; COPPER ALLOYS; PRECIPITATION; COPPER SULFIDES; MORPHOLOGY; AUGER ELECTRON SPECTROSCOPY; ELECTRON MICROSCOPY

Citation Formats

Van Agterveld, D.T.L., Palasantzas, G., and De Hosson, J.T.M. Effects of precipitates in Cu upon impact fracture: An ultra-high-vacuum study with local probe scanning Auger/electron microscopy. United States: N. p., 2000. Web. doi:10.1016/S1359-6454(99)00458-9.
Van Agterveld, D.T.L., Palasantzas, G., & De Hosson, J.T.M. Effects of precipitates in Cu upon impact fracture: An ultra-high-vacuum study with local probe scanning Auger/electron microscopy. United States. doi:10.1016/S1359-6454(99)00458-9.
Van Agterveld, D.T.L., Palasantzas, G., and De Hosson, J.T.M. Thu . "Effects of precipitates in Cu upon impact fracture: An ultra-high-vacuum study with local probe scanning Auger/electron microscopy". United States. doi:10.1016/S1359-6454(99)00458-9.
@article{osti_20075949,
title = {Effects of precipitates in Cu upon impact fracture: An ultra-high-vacuum study with local probe scanning Auger/electron microscopy},
author = {Van Agterveld, D.T.L. and Palasantzas, G. and De Hosson, J.T.M.},
abstractNote = {In situ fracture under ultra-high vacuum (UHV) conditions of copper-alloys containing copper sulfide precipitates exhibits areas in the form of pits. The wide variety of morphologies depends significantly on the size of the existing precipitate. For large precipitates, the fractured surface reveals loops surrounded by step-terrace like structures with sulfur remaining preferentially on straight ledges as nanometer scale Auger images reveal in comparison with scanning electron images. For smaller precipitates (< 3--4 {micro}m), only well defined facets are formed having an almost uniform distribution of sulfur. Qualitatively the loop and facet formation could be explained due to accommodation of the Cu sulfide to the Cu matrix, leading for small precipitates to facet formation, and for large ones to step-terrace structures. Asymmetry in loop structures could be attributed to asymmetry of precipitate shape, while in some areas plasticity effects are also present. Finally, a comparison with distinctly different behavior in Cu-Bi alloys is made.},
doi = {10.1016/S1359-6454(99)00458-9},
journal = {Acta Materialia},
issn = {1359-6454},
number = 8,
volume = 48,
place = {United States},
year = {2000},
month = {5}
}