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Title: Radionuclides in the terrestrial ecosystem near a Canadian uranium mill -- Part 3: Atmospheric deposition rates (pilot test)

Abstract

Atmospheric deposition rates of uranium series radionuclides were directly measured at three sites near the operating Key Lake uranium mill in northern Saskatchewan. Sites impacted by windblown tailings and mill dusts had elevated rates of uranium deposition near the mill and elevated {sup 226}Ra deposition near the tailings compared to a control site. Rainwater collectors, dust jars, and passive vinyl collectors previously used at the Ranger Mine in Australia were pilot-tested. Adhesive vinyl surfaces (1 m{sup 2}) were oriented horizontally, vertically, and facing the ground as a means of measuring gravitational settling, wind impaction, and soil resuspension, respectively. Although the adhesive glue on the vinyls proved difficult to digest, relative differences in deposition mode were found among radionuclides and among sites. Dry deposition was a more important transport mechanism for uranium, {sup 226}Ra, and {sup 210}Pb than rainfall, while more {sup 210}Po was deposited with rainfall.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (CA)
Sponsoring Org.:
Environment Canada; Health Canada; Saskatchewan Health
OSTI Identifier:
20075792
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Health Physics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 78; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: PBD: Jun 2000; Journal ID: ISSN 0017-9078
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEMS; SOILS; CONTAMINATION; RADIATION MONITORING; RADIOECOLOGICAL CONCENTRATION; URANIUM; RADIUM 226; LEAD 210; POLONIUM 210; SASKATCHEWAN; AIR POLLUTION; DEPOSITION

Citation Formats

Thomas, P.A. Radionuclides in the terrestrial ecosystem near a Canadian uranium mill -- Part 3: Atmospheric deposition rates (pilot test). United States: N. p., 2000. Web. doi:10.1097/00004032-200006000-00005.
Thomas, P.A. Radionuclides in the terrestrial ecosystem near a Canadian uranium mill -- Part 3: Atmospheric deposition rates (pilot test). United States. doi:10.1097/00004032-200006000-00005.
Thomas, P.A. Thu . "Radionuclides in the terrestrial ecosystem near a Canadian uranium mill -- Part 3: Atmospheric deposition rates (pilot test)". United States. doi:10.1097/00004032-200006000-00005.
@article{osti_20075792,
title = {Radionuclides in the terrestrial ecosystem near a Canadian uranium mill -- Part 3: Atmospheric deposition rates (pilot test)},
author = {Thomas, P.A.},
abstractNote = {Atmospheric deposition rates of uranium series radionuclides were directly measured at three sites near the operating Key Lake uranium mill in northern Saskatchewan. Sites impacted by windblown tailings and mill dusts had elevated rates of uranium deposition near the mill and elevated {sup 226}Ra deposition near the tailings compared to a control site. Rainwater collectors, dust jars, and passive vinyl collectors previously used at the Ranger Mine in Australia were pilot-tested. Adhesive vinyl surfaces (1 m{sup 2}) were oriented horizontally, vertically, and facing the ground as a means of measuring gravitational settling, wind impaction, and soil resuspension, respectively. Although the adhesive glue on the vinyls proved difficult to digest, relative differences in deposition mode were found among radionuclides and among sites. Dry deposition was a more important transport mechanism for uranium, {sup 226}Ra, and {sup 210}Pb than rainfall, while more {sup 210}Po was deposited with rainfall.},
doi = {10.1097/00004032-200006000-00005},
journal = {Health Physics},
issn = {0017-9078},
number = 6,
volume = 78,
place = {United States},
year = {2000},
month = {6}
}