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Title: Electrokinetic remediation using surfactant-coated ceramic casings

Abstract

Electrokinetic remediation is an emerging technique that can be used to remove metals from saturated or unsaturated soils. In unsaturated soils, control of the medium's water content is essential. Previously used electrode designs have caused detrimental soil wetting due to excess electroosmotic flow out of ceramic-encased anodes. The authors tested a method to reverse the electroosmotic flow at the anode by treating the ceramic casing with the cationic surfactant hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA). Laboratory tests showed the untreated ceramic had an electroosmotic permeability of 2.4 x 10{sup {minus}5} cm{sup 2} V{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}. Ceramic treated with HDTMA had an electroosmotic permeability of {minus}1.3 x 10{sup {minus}5} cm{sup 2} V{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}. Under an applied electric potential, electroosmotic flow was reversed in the HDTMA-treated ceramic, indicating a reversed zeta potential due to formation of an HDTMA bilayer on the ceramic surface. Field tests conducted over a 6-month period showed negligible water loss from HDTMA-treated ceramic compared to untreated ceramics. The results indicated that a surfactant treatment to the anode ceramic casing can greatly improve the application of electrokinetics in unsaturated environments.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
20075773
DOE Contract Number:  
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Journal of Environmental Engineering (New York)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 126; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: PBD: Jun 2000; Journal ID: ISSN 0733-9372
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; REMEDIAL ACTION; IN-SITU PROCESSING; METALS; SOILS; COVERINGS; SURFACTANTS; CERAMICS

Citation Formats

Mattson, E.D., Bowman, R.S., and Lindgren, E.R. Electrokinetic remediation using surfactant-coated ceramic casings. United States: N. p., 2000. Web. doi:10.1061/(ASCE)0733-9372(2000)126:6(534).
Mattson, E.D., Bowman, R.S., & Lindgren, E.R. Electrokinetic remediation using surfactant-coated ceramic casings. United States. doi:10.1061/(ASCE)0733-9372(2000)126:6(534).
Mattson, E.D., Bowman, R.S., and Lindgren, E.R. Thu . "Electrokinetic remediation using surfactant-coated ceramic casings". United States. doi:10.1061/(ASCE)0733-9372(2000)126:6(534).
@article{osti_20075773,
title = {Electrokinetic remediation using surfactant-coated ceramic casings},
author = {Mattson, E.D. and Bowman, R.S. and Lindgren, E.R.},
abstractNote = {Electrokinetic remediation is an emerging technique that can be used to remove metals from saturated or unsaturated soils. In unsaturated soils, control of the medium's water content is essential. Previously used electrode designs have caused detrimental soil wetting due to excess electroosmotic flow out of ceramic-encased anodes. The authors tested a method to reverse the electroosmotic flow at the anode by treating the ceramic casing with the cationic surfactant hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA). Laboratory tests showed the untreated ceramic had an electroosmotic permeability of 2.4 x 10{sup {minus}5} cm{sup 2} V{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}. Ceramic treated with HDTMA had an electroosmotic permeability of {minus}1.3 x 10{sup {minus}5} cm{sup 2} V{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}. Under an applied electric potential, electroosmotic flow was reversed in the HDTMA-treated ceramic, indicating a reversed zeta potential due to formation of an HDTMA bilayer on the ceramic surface. Field tests conducted over a 6-month period showed negligible water loss from HDTMA-treated ceramic compared to untreated ceramics. The results indicated that a surfactant treatment to the anode ceramic casing can greatly improve the application of electrokinetics in unsaturated environments.},
doi = {10.1061/(ASCE)0733-9372(2000)126:6(534)},
journal = {Journal of Environmental Engineering (New York)},
issn = {0733-9372},
number = 6,
volume = 126,
place = {United States},
year = {2000},
month = {6}
}