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Title: Molecular analyses of novel methanotrophic communities in forest soil that oxidize atmospheric methane

Abstract

Forest and other upland soils are important sinks for atmospheric CH{sub 4}, consuming 20 to 60 Tg of CH{sub 4} per year. Consumption of atmospheric CH{sub 4} by soil is a microbiological process. However, little is known about the methanotrophic bacterial community in forest soils. The authors measured vertical profiles of atmospheric CH{sub 4} oxidation rates in a German forest soil and characterized the methanotrophic populations by PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) with primer sets targeting the pmoA gene, coding for the {alpha} subunit of the particulate methane monooxygenase, and the small-subunit rRNA gene (SSU rDNA) of all life. The forest soil was a sink for atmospheric CH{sub 4} in situ and in vitro at all times. In winter, atmospheric CH{sub 4} was oxidized in a well-defined subsurface soil layer, whereas in summer, the complete soil core was active. The content of total extractable DNA was about 10-fold higher in summer than in winter. It decreased with soil depth from about 40 to 1 {micro}g DNA per g (dry weight) of soil. The PCR product concentration of SSU rDNA of all life was constant both in winter and in summer. However, the PCR product concentration of pmoA changedmore » with depth and season. pmoA was detected only in soil layers with active CH{sub 4} oxidation, i.e., 6 to 16 cm deep in winter and throughout the soil core in summer. The same methanotrophic populations were present in winter and summer. Layers with high CH{sub 4} consumption rates also exhibited more bands of pmoA in DGGE, indicating that high CH{sub 4} oxidation activity was positively correlated with the number of methanotrophic populations present. The pmoA sequences derived from excised DGGE bands were only distantly related to those of known methanotrophs, indicating the existence of unknown methanotrophs involved in atmospheric CH{sub 4} consumption.« less

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Terrestrische Mikrobiologie, Marburg (DE)
OSTI Identifier:
20075755
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Applied and Environmental Microbiology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 66; Journal Issue: 5; Other Information: PBD: May 2000; Journal ID: ISSN 0099-2240
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; SOILS; CARBON SINKS; METHANE; FORESTS; METHANOTROPHIC BACTERIA; CARBON CYCLE; DNA; POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION

Citation Formats

Henckel, T., Jaeckel, U., Schnell, S., and Conrad, R. Molecular analyses of novel methanotrophic communities in forest soil that oxidize atmospheric methane. United States: N. p., 2000. Web. doi:10.1128/AEM.66.5.1801-1808.2000.
Henckel, T., Jaeckel, U., Schnell, S., & Conrad, R. Molecular analyses of novel methanotrophic communities in forest soil that oxidize atmospheric methane. United States. doi:10.1128/AEM.66.5.1801-1808.2000.
Henckel, T., Jaeckel, U., Schnell, S., and Conrad, R. Mon . "Molecular analyses of novel methanotrophic communities in forest soil that oxidize atmospheric methane". United States. doi:10.1128/AEM.66.5.1801-1808.2000.
@article{osti_20075755,
title = {Molecular analyses of novel methanotrophic communities in forest soil that oxidize atmospheric methane},
author = {Henckel, T. and Jaeckel, U. and Schnell, S. and Conrad, R.},
abstractNote = {Forest and other upland soils are important sinks for atmospheric CH{sub 4}, consuming 20 to 60 Tg of CH{sub 4} per year. Consumption of atmospheric CH{sub 4} by soil is a microbiological process. However, little is known about the methanotrophic bacterial community in forest soils. The authors measured vertical profiles of atmospheric CH{sub 4} oxidation rates in a German forest soil and characterized the methanotrophic populations by PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) with primer sets targeting the pmoA gene, coding for the {alpha} subunit of the particulate methane monooxygenase, and the small-subunit rRNA gene (SSU rDNA) of all life. The forest soil was a sink for atmospheric CH{sub 4} in situ and in vitro at all times. In winter, atmospheric CH{sub 4} was oxidized in a well-defined subsurface soil layer, whereas in summer, the complete soil core was active. The content of total extractable DNA was about 10-fold higher in summer than in winter. It decreased with soil depth from about 40 to 1 {micro}g DNA per g (dry weight) of soil. The PCR product concentration of SSU rDNA of all life was constant both in winter and in summer. However, the PCR product concentration of pmoA changed with depth and season. pmoA was detected only in soil layers with active CH{sub 4} oxidation, i.e., 6 to 16 cm deep in winter and throughout the soil core in summer. The same methanotrophic populations were present in winter and summer. Layers with high CH{sub 4} consumption rates also exhibited more bands of pmoA in DGGE, indicating that high CH{sub 4} oxidation activity was positively correlated with the number of methanotrophic populations present. The pmoA sequences derived from excised DGGE bands were only distantly related to those of known methanotrophs, indicating the existence of unknown methanotrophs involved in atmospheric CH{sub 4} consumption.},
doi = {10.1128/AEM.66.5.1801-1808.2000},
journal = {Applied and Environmental Microbiology},
issn = {0099-2240},
number = 5,
volume = 66,
place = {United States},
year = {2000},
month = {5}
}