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Title: Field assessments in conjunction with whole effluent toxicity testing

Abstract

Whole effluent toxicity (WET) tests are widely used to assess potential effects of wastewater discharges on aquatic life. This paper represents a summary of chapters in a 1996 Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry-sponsored workshop and a literature review concerning linkages between WET testing and associated field biomonitoring. Most published studies thus far focus primarily on benthic macroinvertebrates and on effluent-dominated stream systems in which effluents demonstrate little or no significant acute toxicity. Fewer studies examine WET test predictability in other aquatic ecosystems (e.g., wetlands, estuaries, large rivers) or deal with instream biota such as fish and primary producers. Published results indicate that standards for the usual WET freshwater test species, Ceriodaphnia dubia and Pimephales promelas, may not always protect most of the species inhabiting a receiving stream. Although WET tests are useful in predicting aquatic individual responses, they are not meant to directly measure natural population or community responses. Further, they do not address bioconcentration or bioaccumulation of hydrophobic compounds; do not assess eutrophication effects in receiving systems; and lastly, do not reflect genotoxic effects or function to test for endocrine-disrupting chemicals. Consequently, a more direct evaluation of ecosystem health, using bioassessment techniques, may be needed to properly evaluatemore » aquatic systems affected by wastewater discharges.« less

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of North Texas, Denton, TX (US)
OSTI Identifier:
20075729
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 19; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: PBD: Jan 2000; Journal ID: ISSN 0730-7268
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGANISMS AND BIOLOGICAL MATERIALS; CHEMICAL EFFLUENTS; BIOLOGICAL INDICATORS; WATER POLLUTION; BIOASSAY; FIELD TESTS; WASTE WATER; AQUATIC ORGANISMS

Citation Formats

La Point, T W, and Waller, W T. Field assessments in conjunction with whole effluent toxicity testing. United States: N. p., 2000. Web. doi:10.1897/1551-5028(2000)019<0014:FAICWW>2.3.CO;2.
La Point, T W, & Waller, W T. Field assessments in conjunction with whole effluent toxicity testing. United States. https://doi.org/10.1897/1551-5028(2000)019<0014:FAICWW>2.3.CO;2
La Point, T W, and Waller, W T. 2000. "Field assessments in conjunction with whole effluent toxicity testing". United States. https://doi.org/10.1897/1551-5028(2000)019<0014:FAICWW>2.3.CO;2.
@article{osti_20075729,
title = {Field assessments in conjunction with whole effluent toxicity testing},
author = {La Point, T W and Waller, W T},
abstractNote = {Whole effluent toxicity (WET) tests are widely used to assess potential effects of wastewater discharges on aquatic life. This paper represents a summary of chapters in a 1996 Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry-sponsored workshop and a literature review concerning linkages between WET testing and associated field biomonitoring. Most published studies thus far focus primarily on benthic macroinvertebrates and on effluent-dominated stream systems in which effluents demonstrate little or no significant acute toxicity. Fewer studies examine WET test predictability in other aquatic ecosystems (e.g., wetlands, estuaries, large rivers) or deal with instream biota such as fish and primary producers. Published results indicate that standards for the usual WET freshwater test species, Ceriodaphnia dubia and Pimephales promelas, may not always protect most of the species inhabiting a receiving stream. Although WET tests are useful in predicting aquatic individual responses, they are not meant to directly measure natural population or community responses. Further, they do not address bioconcentration or bioaccumulation of hydrophobic compounds; do not assess eutrophication effects in receiving systems; and lastly, do not reflect genotoxic effects or function to test for endocrine-disrupting chemicals. Consequently, a more direct evaluation of ecosystem health, using bioassessment techniques, may be needed to properly evaluate aquatic systems affected by wastewater discharges.},
doi = {10.1897/1551-5028(2000)019<0014:FAICWW>2.3.CO;2},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/20075729}, journal = {Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry},
issn = {0730-7268},
number = 1,
volume = 19,
place = {United States},
year = {2000},
month = {1}
}