skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Municipal solid waste slope failure. 2: Stability analyses

Abstract

Analyses are presented to investigate the case of a large slope failure in a municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill that developed through the underlying native soil. The engineering properties of the waste and native soil are described in a companion paper by Eid et al. (2000). Some of the conclusions from this case history include (1) native colluvial/residual soils in the Cincinnati area underlying MSW can mobilize a drained shear strength less than the fully softened value without recent evidence of previous sliding; (2) strain incompatibility and progressive failure can occur between MSW and underlying materials and cause a reduction in the mobilized shear strength; (3) a stability evaluation of interim slopes, especially when the slope toe will be excavated, blasting will be occurring, and waste placement continues at the top of slope, should be conducted, even though it may not be required by regulations; and (4) the reappearance of cracking at the top of an MSW landfill slope is probably an indication of slope instability and not settlement.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (US)
OSTI Identifier:
20062619
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 20062619
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Journal of Geotechnical and Geoenvironmental Engineering
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 126; Journal Issue: 5; Other Information: PBD: May 2000; Journal ID: ISSN 1090-0241
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; MUNICIPAL WASTES; SOLID WASTES; SANITARY LANDFILLS; SLOPE STABILITY; LANDSLIDES; OHIO; FAILURE MODE ANALYSIS; SOIL MECHANICS

Citation Formats

Stark, T.D., Eid, H.T., Evans, W.D., and Sherry, P.E. Municipal solid waste slope failure. 2: Stability analyses. United States: N. p., 2000. Web. doi:10.1061/(ASCE)1090-0241(2000)126:5(408).
Stark, T.D., Eid, H.T., Evans, W.D., & Sherry, P.E. Municipal solid waste slope failure. 2: Stability analyses. United States. doi:10.1061/(ASCE)1090-0241(2000)126:5(408).
Stark, T.D., Eid, H.T., Evans, W.D., and Sherry, P.E. Mon . "Municipal solid waste slope failure. 2: Stability analyses". United States. doi:10.1061/(ASCE)1090-0241(2000)126:5(408).
@article{osti_20062619,
title = {Municipal solid waste slope failure. 2: Stability analyses},
author = {Stark, T.D. and Eid, H.T. and Evans, W.D. and Sherry, P.E.},
abstractNote = {Analyses are presented to investigate the case of a large slope failure in a municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill that developed through the underlying native soil. The engineering properties of the waste and native soil are described in a companion paper by Eid et al. (2000). Some of the conclusions from this case history include (1) native colluvial/residual soils in the Cincinnati area underlying MSW can mobilize a drained shear strength less than the fully softened value without recent evidence of previous sliding; (2) strain incompatibility and progressive failure can occur between MSW and underlying materials and cause a reduction in the mobilized shear strength; (3) a stability evaluation of interim slopes, especially when the slope toe will be excavated, blasting will be occurring, and waste placement continues at the top of slope, should be conducted, even though it may not be required by regulations; and (4) the reappearance of cracking at the top of an MSW landfill slope is probably an indication of slope instability and not settlement.},
doi = {10.1061/(ASCE)1090-0241(2000)126:5(408)},
journal = {Journal of Geotechnical and Geoenvironmental Engineering},
issn = {1090-0241},
number = 5,
volume = 126,
place = {United States},
year = {2000},
month = {5}
}