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Title: Proton and neutron irradiation effect of Ti: Sapphires

Abstract

Various effects of proton and neutron irradiated Ti: sapphires were studied. Proton irradiation induced F, F{sup +} and V center in Ti: sapphires and 3310 cm{sup -1} infrared absorption, and made ultraviolet absorption edge shift to short wave. Neutron irradiation produced a number of F, F{sup +} and F{sub 2} centers and larger defects in Ti: sapphires, and changed Ti{sup 4+}into Ti{sup 3+} ions. Such valence state variation enhanced characteristic luminescence of Ti: sapphires, and no singular variances of intrinsic fluorescence spectra of Ti: sapphires took place with neutron flux of 1 x 10{sup 17}n/cm{sup 2}, but the fluorescence vanished with neutron flux of 1 x 10{sup 18}n/cm{sup 2} which means the threshold for the concentration of improving Ti{sup 3+} ions by neutron irradiation.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Yunnan Univ., Kunming (CN)
OSTI Identifier:
20050996
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 1999 IEEE International Conference on Plasma Science, Monterey, CA (US), 06/20/1999--06/24/1999; Other Information: PBD: 1999; Related Information: In: The 26th IEEE international conference on plasma science, 342 pages.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; SAPPHIRE; PHYSICAL RADIATION EFFECTS; OPTICAL PROPERTIES; DOPED MATERIALS; TITANIUM IONS; COLOR CENTERS

Citation Formats

Wang, G., Zhang, J., and Yang, J.. Proton and neutron irradiation effect of Ti: Sapphires. United States: N. p., 1999. Web.
Wang, G., Zhang, J., & Yang, J.. Proton and neutron irradiation effect of Ti: Sapphires. United States.
Wang, G., Zhang, J., and Yang, J.. 1999. "Proton and neutron irradiation effect of Ti: Sapphires". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_20050996,
title = {Proton and neutron irradiation effect of Ti: Sapphires},
author = {Wang, G. and Zhang, J. and Yang, J.},
abstractNote = {Various effects of proton and neutron irradiated Ti: sapphires were studied. Proton irradiation induced F, F{sup +} and V center in Ti: sapphires and 3310 cm{sup -1} infrared absorption, and made ultraviolet absorption edge shift to short wave. Neutron irradiation produced a number of F, F{sup +} and F{sub 2} centers and larger defects in Ti: sapphires, and changed Ti{sup 4+}into Ti{sup 3+} ions. Such valence state variation enhanced characteristic luminescence of Ti: sapphires, and no singular variances of intrinsic fluorescence spectra of Ti: sapphires took place with neutron flux of 1 x 10{sup 17}n/cm{sup 2}, but the fluorescence vanished with neutron flux of 1 x 10{sup 18}n/cm{sup 2} which means the threshold for the concentration of improving Ti{sup 3+} ions by neutron irradiation.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1999,
month = 7
}

Conference:
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