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Title: Performance of passive cooled hospital complexes in India over a period of 55 years

Abstract

This paper reports the Thoburn-Perrill research on climate-oriented buildings and their walk-through air-conditioning tunnels, along with a record of their living and working in these houses and hospitals over a period of 55 years. Also, it provides a short description of much larger, radioactive fall-out shelter tunnels constructed as refuges for patients and hospital workers. The research is based on the Heat-Decay curve developed by Professor W.C. Thoburn in 1940. The tunnel system allowed the conventional air-conditioning system to be downsized by 80%. The operating costs were 20% of the conventional equipment.

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20050785
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: SOLAR 99, Portland, ME (US), 06/12/1999--06/16/1999; Other Information: PBD: 1999; Related Information: In: Solar 99 conference: Proceedings of ASES annual conference -- Proceedings of 24th national passive solar conference, by Campbell-Howe, R.; Wilkins-Crowder, B. [eds.], 779 pages.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; 15 GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; INDIA; HOSPITALS; PERFORMANCE; TUNNELS; FALLOUT SHELTERS; GEOTHERMAL AIR CONDITIONING; SEASONAL VARIATIONS

Citation Formats

Perrill, C.V. Performance of passive cooled hospital complexes in India over a period of 55 years. United States: N. p., 1999. Web.
Perrill, C.V. Performance of passive cooled hospital complexes in India over a period of 55 years. United States.
Perrill, C.V. Thu . "Performance of passive cooled hospital complexes in India over a period of 55 years". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_20050785,
title = {Performance of passive cooled hospital complexes in India over a period of 55 years},
author = {Perrill, C.V.},
abstractNote = {This paper reports the Thoburn-Perrill research on climate-oriented buildings and their walk-through air-conditioning tunnels, along with a record of their living and working in these houses and hospitals over a period of 55 years. Also, it provides a short description of much larger, radioactive fall-out shelter tunnels constructed as refuges for patients and hospital workers. The research is based on the Heat-Decay curve developed by Professor W.C. Thoburn in 1940. The tunnel system allowed the conventional air-conditioning system to be downsized by 80%. The operating costs were 20% of the conventional equipment.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 1999},
month = {Thu Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 1999}
}

Conference:
Other availability
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  • 25 Cr duplex (austenitic/ferritic) stainless steel containing copper and nitrogen offers a cost effective solution to material selection for pollution control equipment. The properties of duplex stainless steel which make it suitable for this type of application are discussed and long term performance histories presented. It is concluded that high alloy duplex steel has an important role to play in the production of low maintenance reliable equipment for FGD and other pollution control systems.
  • Performance assessments (PAs) have been used for many years for the analysis of post-closure hazards associated with a radioactive waste disposal facility and to provide a reasonable expectation of the ability of the site and facility design to meet objectives for the protection of members of the public and the environment. The use of PA to support decision-making for LLW disposal facilities has been mandated in United States Department of Energy (USDOE) directives governing radioactive waste management since 1988 (currently DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management). Prior to that time, PAs were also used in a less formal role. Overmore » the past 20+ years, the USDOE approach to conduct, review and apply PAs has evolved into an efficient, rigorous and mature process that includes specific requirements for continuous improvement and independent reviews. The PA process has evolved through refinement of a graded and iterative approach designed to help focus efforts on those aspects of the problem expected to have the greatest influence on the decision being made. Many of the evolutionary changes to the PA process are linked to the refinement of the PA maintenance concept that has proven to be an important element of USDOE PA requirements in the context of supporting decision-making for safe disposal of LLW. The PA maintenance concept represents the evolution of the graded and iterative philosophy and has helped to drive the evolution of PAs from a deterministic compliance calculation into a systematic approach that helps to focus on critical aspects of the disposal system in a manner designed to provide a more informed basis for decision-making throughout the life of a disposal facility (e.g., monitoring, research and testing, waste acceptance criteria, design improvements, data collection, model refinements). A significant evolution in PA modeling has been associated with improved use of uncertainty and sensitivity analysis techniques to support efficient implementation of the graded and iterative approach. Rather than attempt to exactly predict the migration of radionuclides in a disposal unit, the best PAs have evolved into tools that provide a range of results to guide decision-makers in planning the most efficient, cost effective, and safe disposal of radionuclides.« less
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