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Title: Corrosion behavior of mild steel in acetic acid solutions

Abstract

The corrosion behavior of mild steel in acetic acid (CH{sub 3}COOH) solutions was studied by weight loss and potentiostatic polarization techniques. The variation in corrosion rate of mild steel with concentrations of CH{sub 3}COOH, evaluated by weight loss and electrochemical techniques, showed marked resemblance. From both techniques, the maximum corrosion rate was observed for 20% CH{sub 3}COOH solution at all three experimental temperatures (25, 35, and 45 C). Anodic polarization curves showed active-passive behavior at each concentration, except at 80% CH{sub 3}COOH. Critical current density (i{sub c}) passive current density (I{sub n}), primary passivation potential (E{sub pp}), and potential for passivity (E{sub p}) had their highest values in 20% CH{sub 3}COOH solution. With an increase in temperature, while the anodic polarization curves shifted toward higher current density region at each concentration, the passive region became progressively less distinguishable. With the addition of sodium acetate (NaCOOCH{sub 3}) as a supporting electrolyte, the passive range was enlarged substantially. However, the transpassive region commenced at more or less the same potential. Cathodic polarization curves were almost identical irrespective of the concentration of CH{sub 3}COOH or temperature.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Banaras Hindu Univ., Varanasi (IN)
OSTI Identifier:
20050517
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Corrosion (Houston); Journal Volume: 56; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: PBD: Apr 2000
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; CORROSION; STEELS; ACETIC ACID; ELECTROCHEMISTRY; WEIGHT; CURRENT DENSITY; CONCENTRATION RATIO; TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE; SODIUM COMPOUNDS; ACETATES

Citation Formats

Singh, M.M., and Gupta, A. Corrosion behavior of mild steel in acetic acid solutions. United States: N. p., 2000. Web. doi:10.5006/1.3280540.
Singh, M.M., & Gupta, A. Corrosion behavior of mild steel in acetic acid solutions. United States. doi:10.5006/1.3280540.
Singh, M.M., and Gupta, A. 2000. "Corrosion behavior of mild steel in acetic acid solutions". United States. doi:10.5006/1.3280540.
@article{osti_20050517,
title = {Corrosion behavior of mild steel in acetic acid solutions},
author = {Singh, M.M. and Gupta, A.},
abstractNote = {The corrosion behavior of mild steel in acetic acid (CH{sub 3}COOH) solutions was studied by weight loss and potentiostatic polarization techniques. The variation in corrosion rate of mild steel with concentrations of CH{sub 3}COOH, evaluated by weight loss and electrochemical techniques, showed marked resemblance. From both techniques, the maximum corrosion rate was observed for 20% CH{sub 3}COOH solution at all three experimental temperatures (25, 35, and 45 C). Anodic polarization curves showed active-passive behavior at each concentration, except at 80% CH{sub 3}COOH. Critical current density (i{sub c}) passive current density (I{sub n}), primary passivation potential (E{sub pp}), and potential for passivity (E{sub p}) had their highest values in 20% CH{sub 3}COOH solution. With an increase in temperature, while the anodic polarization curves shifted toward higher current density region at each concentration, the passive region became progressively less distinguishable. With the addition of sodium acetate (NaCOOCH{sub 3}) as a supporting electrolyte, the passive range was enlarged substantially. However, the transpassive region commenced at more or less the same potential. Cathodic polarization curves were almost identical irrespective of the concentration of CH{sub 3}COOH or temperature.},
doi = {10.5006/1.3280540},
journal = {Corrosion (Houston)},
number = 4,
volume = 56,
place = {United States},
year = 2000,
month = 4
}
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