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Title: Comparison of dust sampling methods in Estonia and Sweden -- A field study

Abstract

The purpose of this field study was to compare an Estonian dust sampling method, a method also used in other former East Block countries, with a Swedish method and to estimate inter-method agreement with statistical analyses. The Estonian standard method (ESM), used to assess exposure in Estonia since the early 1950s, is based on a strategy where air samples are collected for 10 minutes every hour over a full shift. This method was compared to a Swedish standard method (SSM), a modified NIOSH method, comparable to international standards, where one air sample is collected during a full shift. The study was carried out at a cement plant that in the beginning of the 1990s was subjected to an epidemiological study, including collection of exposure data. The results of the analysis from 31 clusters of parallel samples of the two methods, when dust consisting of Portland cement was collected, showed a relatively weak correlation between the SSM and the ESM, r{sub i} = 0.91 (Pearson's intro-class correlation coefficient). A conversion factor between the two methods was estimated, where SSM is 0.69 times ESm and the limits of agreement are 0.25 and 1.84, respectively. These results indicate a substantial intermethod difference. Themore » authors therefore recommend that measurements obtained from the two methods should not be used interchangeably. Because the present study is of limited extent, the findings are confined to the operations studied and further studies covering other exposure situation will be needed.« less

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Medical Center Hospital, Oerebro (SE)
OSTI Identifier:
20020658
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Occupational and Environmental Hygiene; Journal Volume: 14; Journal Issue: 9; Other Information: PBD: Sep 1999
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; AIR POLLUTION; AIR POLLUTION MONITORING; ESTONIA; SWEDEN; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; DUSTS; PORTLAND CEMENT; MEASURING METHODS

Citation Formats

Berg, P., Jaakmees, V., and Bodin, L. Comparison of dust sampling methods in Estonia and Sweden -- A field study. United States: N. p., 1999. Web. doi:10.1080/104732299302396.
Berg, P., Jaakmees, V., & Bodin, L. Comparison of dust sampling methods in Estonia and Sweden -- A field study. United States. doi:10.1080/104732299302396.
Berg, P., Jaakmees, V., and Bodin, L. 1999. "Comparison of dust sampling methods in Estonia and Sweden -- A field study". United States. doi:10.1080/104732299302396.
@article{osti_20020658,
title = {Comparison of dust sampling methods in Estonia and Sweden -- A field study},
author = {Berg, P. and Jaakmees, V. and Bodin, L.},
abstractNote = {The purpose of this field study was to compare an Estonian dust sampling method, a method also used in other former East Block countries, with a Swedish method and to estimate inter-method agreement with statistical analyses. The Estonian standard method (ESM), used to assess exposure in Estonia since the early 1950s, is based on a strategy where air samples are collected for 10 minutes every hour over a full shift. This method was compared to a Swedish standard method (SSM), a modified NIOSH method, comparable to international standards, where one air sample is collected during a full shift. The study was carried out at a cement plant that in the beginning of the 1990s was subjected to an epidemiological study, including collection of exposure data. The results of the analysis from 31 clusters of parallel samples of the two methods, when dust consisting of Portland cement was collected, showed a relatively weak correlation between the SSM and the ESM, r{sub i} = 0.91 (Pearson's intro-class correlation coefficient). A conversion factor between the two methods was estimated, where SSM is 0.69 times ESm and the limits of agreement are 0.25 and 1.84, respectively. These results indicate a substantial intermethod difference. The authors therefore recommend that measurements obtained from the two methods should not be used interchangeably. Because the present study is of limited extent, the findings are confined to the operations studied and further studies covering other exposure situation will be needed.},
doi = {10.1080/104732299302396},
journal = {Applied Occupational and Environmental Hygiene},
number = 9,
volume = 14,
place = {United States},
year = 1999,
month = 9
}
  • Comparison of mutation spectra at the hypoxanthine-phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) gene of peripheral blood T lymphocytes may provide insight into the aetiology of somatic mutation contributing to carcinogenesis and other diseases. To increase knowledge of mutation spectra in healthy people, we have analyzed HPRT mutant T-cells of 50 healthy Russians originally recruited as controls for a study of Chernobyl clean-up workers (Jones et al. Radiation Res. 158, 2002, 424). Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reactions and DNA sequencing identified 161 independent mutations among 176 thioguanine resistant mutants. Forty (40) mutations affected splicing mechanisms and 27 deletions or insertions of 1 to 60more » nucleotides were identified. Ninety four (94) single base substitutions were identified, including 62 different mutations at 55 different nucleotide positions, of which 19 had not previously been reported in human T-cells. Comparison of this base substitution spectrum with mutation spectra in a USA (Burkhart-Schultz et al. Carcinogenesis 17, 1996, 1871) and two Swedish populations (Podlutsky et al, Carcinogenesis 19, 1998, 557, Podlutsky et al. Mutation Res. 431, 1999, 325) revealed similarity in the type, frequency and distribution of mutations in the four spectra, consistent with aetiologies inherent in human metabolism. There were 15-19 identical mutations in the three pair-wise comparisons of Russian with USA and Swedish spectra. Intriguingly, there were 21 mutations unique to the Russian spectrum, and comparison by the Monte Carlo method of Adams and Skopek (J. Mol. Biol. 194, 1987, 391) indicated that the Russian spectrum was different from both Swedish spectra (P=0.007, 0.002) but not different from the USA spectrum (P=0.07), when Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons was made (p < 0.008 required for significance). Age and smoking did not account for these differences. Other factors causing mutational differences need to be explored.« less
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