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Title: Coupled meso-macro simulations of plasticity: Validation tests

Abstract

A new numerical model has been developed in order to study the plastic deformation of mesoscopic crystalline samples under complex boundary conditions. The model is based on the coupling of two types of simulations, a dislocation dynamics and a finite element code. The former accounts for the dislocation-based plastic properties of the material, thus replacing the usual constitutive form, while the latter treats the boundary value problem and cares of the mechanical equilibrium. In order to test the hybrid simulation and examine its accuracy, the self-stress fields of straight dislocations have been computed in a single crystal of finite size and compared with the predictions of the isotropic elasticity theory. The excellent agreement obtained emphasizes the enormous potential of such hybrid methods for a rigorous treatment of meso-macro problems in plasticity.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
DMSE, Chatillon (FR)
OSTI Identifier:
20014960
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Multiscale Modeling of Materials, Boston, MA (US), 11/30/1998--12/03/1998; Other Information: Single article reprints are available through University Microfilms Inc., 300 North Zeeb Rd., Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106 (US); PBD: 1999; Related Information: In: Multiscale modeling of materials. Materials Research Society symposium proceedings: Volume 538, by Bulatov, V.V.; Diaz de la Rubia, T.; Phillips, R.; Kaxiras, E.; Ghoniem, N. [eds.], 607 pages.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; PLASTICITY; CRYSTALS; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; FINITE ELEMENT METHOD; DISLOCATIONS; BOUNDARY CONDITIONS; STRESSES; VALIDATION; THEORETICAL DATA

Citation Formats

Lemarchand, C., Devincre, B., Kubin, L.P., and Chaboche, J.L. Coupled meso-macro simulations of plasticity: Validation tests. United States: N. p., 1999. Web.
Lemarchand, C., Devincre, B., Kubin, L.P., & Chaboche, J.L. Coupled meso-macro simulations of plasticity: Validation tests. United States.
Lemarchand, C., Devincre, B., Kubin, L.P., and Chaboche, J.L. Thu . "Coupled meso-macro simulations of plasticity: Validation tests". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_20014960,
title = {Coupled meso-macro simulations of plasticity: Validation tests},
author = {Lemarchand, C. and Devincre, B. and Kubin, L.P. and Chaboche, J.L.},
abstractNote = {A new numerical model has been developed in order to study the plastic deformation of mesoscopic crystalline samples under complex boundary conditions. The model is based on the coupling of two types of simulations, a dislocation dynamics and a finite element code. The former accounts for the dislocation-based plastic properties of the material, thus replacing the usual constitutive form, while the latter treats the boundary value problem and cares of the mechanical equilibrium. In order to test the hybrid simulation and examine its accuracy, the self-stress fields of straight dislocations have been computed in a single crystal of finite size and compared with the predictions of the isotropic elasticity theory. The excellent agreement obtained emphasizes the enormous potential of such hybrid methods for a rigorous treatment of meso-macro problems in plasticity.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 1999},
month = {Thu Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 1999}
}

Conference:
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