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Title: Effect of burrowing by the crab Helice crassa on chemistry of intertidal muddy sediments

Abstract

The chemical environment was measured in vertical and horizontal profiles of cores taken from intertidal sediments that are extensively burrowed by the mud crab Helice crassa. The crab burrows folded the thin (2--5 mm) oxic layer into the sediment, and the burrows appeared to have a strong influence on the concentrations of acid volatile sulfide (AVS), acid-extractable Fe{sup II} (probably FeCO{sub 3} and FeS), Fe{sup III} (probably predominantly hydrous ferric oxide FeOOH), and Mn{sup II,III,IV} and a modest effect on FeS{sub 2} but no effect on total organic carbon, total organic nitrogen, or acid-extractable zinc concentrations. The oxic layer was thinner in the burrows than on the sediment surface and showed some minor differences in solid-state chemistry, with higher FeOOH and lower FeS{sub 2} concentrations in the burrow walls. Acid volatile sulfide, FeCO{sub 3} were found in the oxic layers, presumably because of deposits from crab excavations of deeper anoxic sediments. The chemistry of the bioturbated profile was highly variable, not only because of existing burrows but also because of infilled abandoned burrows. The colors of the sediment profile were strongly related to the concentrations of Fe{sup II}, AVS, FE{sup III}, Mn, and FeS{sub 2}. The implications of the observedmore » sediment chemistry to the fate and bioavailability of contaminants is discussed.« less

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Inst. of Water and Atmospheric Research, Hamilton (NZ)
OSTI Identifier:
20006636
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 20006636
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 18; Journal Issue: 9; Other Information: PBD: Sep 1999; Journal ID: ISSN 0730-7268
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; WATER POLLUTION; SEDIMENTS; BIOLOGICAL AVAILABILITY; CRABS; MANGANESE; IRON; SULFIDES; ZINC; DIAGENESIS

Citation Formats

Williamson, R.B., Wilcock, R.J., Wise, B.E., and Pickmere, S.E. Effect of burrowing by the crab Helice crassa on chemistry of intertidal muddy sediments. United States: N. p., 1999. Web. doi:10.1897/1551-5028(1999)018<2078:EOBBTC>2.3.CO;2.
Williamson, R.B., Wilcock, R.J., Wise, B.E., & Pickmere, S.E. Effect of burrowing by the crab Helice crassa on chemistry of intertidal muddy sediments. United States. doi:10.1897/1551-5028(1999)018<2078:EOBBTC>2.3.CO;2.
Williamson, R.B., Wilcock, R.J., Wise, B.E., and Pickmere, S.E. Wed . "Effect of burrowing by the crab Helice crassa on chemistry of intertidal muddy sediments". United States. doi:10.1897/1551-5028(1999)018<2078:EOBBTC>2.3.CO;2.
@article{osti_20006636,
title = {Effect of burrowing by the crab Helice crassa on chemistry of intertidal muddy sediments},
author = {Williamson, R.B. and Wilcock, R.J. and Wise, B.E. and Pickmere, S.E.},
abstractNote = {The chemical environment was measured in vertical and horizontal profiles of cores taken from intertidal sediments that are extensively burrowed by the mud crab Helice crassa. The crab burrows folded the thin (2--5 mm) oxic layer into the sediment, and the burrows appeared to have a strong influence on the concentrations of acid volatile sulfide (AVS), acid-extractable Fe{sup II} (probably FeCO{sub 3} and FeS), Fe{sup III} (probably predominantly hydrous ferric oxide FeOOH), and Mn{sup II,III,IV} and a modest effect on FeS{sub 2} but no effect on total organic carbon, total organic nitrogen, or acid-extractable zinc concentrations. The oxic layer was thinner in the burrows than on the sediment surface and showed some minor differences in solid-state chemistry, with higher FeOOH and lower FeS{sub 2} concentrations in the burrow walls. Acid volatile sulfide, FeCO{sub 3} were found in the oxic layers, presumably because of deposits from crab excavations of deeper anoxic sediments. The chemistry of the bioturbated profile was highly variable, not only because of existing burrows but also because of infilled abandoned burrows. The colors of the sediment profile were strongly related to the concentrations of Fe{sup II}, AVS, FE{sup III}, Mn, and FeS{sub 2}. The implications of the observed sediment chemistry to the fate and bioavailability of contaminants is discussed.},
doi = {10.1897/1551-5028(1999)018<2078:EOBBTC>2.3.CO;2},
journal = {Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry},
issn = {0730-7268},
number = 9,
volume = 18,
place = {United States},
year = {1999},
month = {9}
}