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Title: Bioaccumulation of 2,2{prime},5,5{prime}-tetrachlorobiphenyl and pyrene by picoplankton (Synechococcus leopoliensis, Cyanophyceae): Influence of variable humic acid concentrations and pH

Abstract

Natural dissolved organic matter (DOM) controls the aqueous phase partitioning of hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs), where the sum of aqueous HOCs is distributed between the bound and free forms of HOCs, that is [HOC-DOM] {leftrightarrow} [HOC] + [DOM]. The hypothesis that the bioavailability of aqueous HOCs can be attributed solely to the concentration of the free form of HOCs was tested. Bioavailability was measured as accumulation of [{sup 14}C]-PCB (IUPAC 52) and [{sup 14}C]-pyrene over 48 h by the phytoplanktonic cyanobacterium Synechococcus leopoliensis. The phytoplankton were exposed within dialysis sacs to freely dissolved HOC at concentrations that were similar in all sacs. However, humic acid concentrations were varied among the sacs. The experiment was designed to vary the concentrations of HOC-HA and HA while keeping the concentration of freely dissolved HOCs at the same levels in all the sacs. Sorption mechanism were probed by manipulating the pH of the exposure medium; the hydrophobicities of the cell surface and the humic acid are pH-sensitive, whereas the freely dissolved concentration of HOCs is pH-invariant. Bioaccumulation was predominantly controlled by the freely dissolved concentration of HOC and was greater at pH 4.3 than at pH 7.3. Although sorption of the PCB-HA and pyrene-HAmore » complexes by S. leopoliensis occurred, this mechanism did not contribute significantly to the total accumulation of PCB of pyrene. These results suggest that the accumulation of HOCs by planktonic microorganisms can be predicted on the basis of the concentration of freely dissolved HOC molecules.« less

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. du Quebec, Ste-Foy, Quebec (CA)
OSTI Identifier:
20006634
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 20006634
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 18; Journal Issue: 9; Other Information: PBD: Sep 1999; Journal ID: ISSN 0730-7268
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 56 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, APPLIED STUDIES; CHLORINATED AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS; PYRENE; BIOLOGICAL ACCUMULATION; WATER POLLUTION; BIOLOGICAL INDICATORS; HUMIC ACIDS; PH VALUE; ORGANIC MATTER; BIOLOGICAL AVAILABILITY; PHYTOPLANKTON

Citation Formats

Twiss, M.R., Granier, L., Lafrance, P., and Campbell, P.G.C. Bioaccumulation of 2,2{prime},5,5{prime}-tetrachlorobiphenyl and pyrene by picoplankton (Synechococcus leopoliensis, Cyanophyceae): Influence of variable humic acid concentrations and pH. United States: N. p., 1999. Web. doi:10.1897/1551-5028(1999)018<2063:BOTAPB>2.3.CO;2.
Twiss, M.R., Granier, L., Lafrance, P., & Campbell, P.G.C. Bioaccumulation of 2,2{prime},5,5{prime}-tetrachlorobiphenyl and pyrene by picoplankton (Synechococcus leopoliensis, Cyanophyceae): Influence of variable humic acid concentrations and pH. United States. doi:10.1897/1551-5028(1999)018<2063:BOTAPB>2.3.CO;2.
Twiss, M.R., Granier, L., Lafrance, P., and Campbell, P.G.C. Wed . "Bioaccumulation of 2,2{prime},5,5{prime}-tetrachlorobiphenyl and pyrene by picoplankton (Synechococcus leopoliensis, Cyanophyceae): Influence of variable humic acid concentrations and pH". United States. doi:10.1897/1551-5028(1999)018<2063:BOTAPB>2.3.CO;2.
@article{osti_20006634,
title = {Bioaccumulation of 2,2{prime},5,5{prime}-tetrachlorobiphenyl and pyrene by picoplankton (Synechococcus leopoliensis, Cyanophyceae): Influence of variable humic acid concentrations and pH},
author = {Twiss, M.R. and Granier, L. and Lafrance, P. and Campbell, P.G.C.},
abstractNote = {Natural dissolved organic matter (DOM) controls the aqueous phase partitioning of hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs), where the sum of aqueous HOCs is distributed between the bound and free forms of HOCs, that is [HOC-DOM] {leftrightarrow} [HOC] + [DOM]. The hypothesis that the bioavailability of aqueous HOCs can be attributed solely to the concentration of the free form of HOCs was tested. Bioavailability was measured as accumulation of [{sup 14}C]-PCB (IUPAC 52) and [{sup 14}C]-pyrene over 48 h by the phytoplanktonic cyanobacterium Synechococcus leopoliensis. The phytoplankton were exposed within dialysis sacs to freely dissolved HOC at concentrations that were similar in all sacs. However, humic acid concentrations were varied among the sacs. The experiment was designed to vary the concentrations of HOC-HA and HA while keeping the concentration of freely dissolved HOCs at the same levels in all the sacs. Sorption mechanism were probed by manipulating the pH of the exposure medium; the hydrophobicities of the cell surface and the humic acid are pH-sensitive, whereas the freely dissolved concentration of HOCs is pH-invariant. Bioaccumulation was predominantly controlled by the freely dissolved concentration of HOC and was greater at pH 4.3 than at pH 7.3. Although sorption of the PCB-HA and pyrene-HA complexes by S. leopoliensis occurred, this mechanism did not contribute significantly to the total accumulation of PCB of pyrene. These results suggest that the accumulation of HOCs by planktonic microorganisms can be predicted on the basis of the concentration of freely dissolved HOC molecules.},
doi = {10.1897/1551-5028(1999)018<2063:BOTAPB>2.3.CO;2},
journal = {Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry},
issn = {0730-7268},
number = 9,
volume = 18,
place = {United States},
year = {1999},
month = {9}
}