skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Assimilation efficiencies of chemical contaminants in aquatic invertebrates: A synthesis

Abstract

Assimilation efficiencies of contaminants from ingested food are critical for understanding chemical accumulation and trophic transfer in aquatic invertebrates. Assimilation efficiency is a first-order physiological parameter that can be used to systematically compare the bioavailability of different contaminants from different foods. The various techniques used to measure contaminant assimilation efficiencies are reviewed. Pulse-chase feeding techniques and the application of gamma-emitting radiotracers have been invaluable in measuring metal assimilation efficiencies in aquatic animals. Uniform radiolabeling of food is required to measure assimilation, but this can be difficult when sediments are the food source. Biological factors that influence contaminant assimilation include food quantity and quality, partitioning of contaminants in the food particles, and digestive physiology of the animals. Other factors influencing assimilation include the behavior of the chemical within the animal's gut and its associations with different geochemical fractions of food particles. Assimilation efficiency is a critical parameter to determine (and to make predictions of) bioaccumulation of chemicals from dietary exposure. Robust estimates of assimilation efficiency coupled with estimates of aqueous uptake can be used to determine the relative importance of aqueous and dietary exposures. For bioaccumulation of metals from sediments, additional studies are required to test whether metals bound to themore » acid-volatile sulfide fraction of sediments can be available to benthic deposit-feeding inverterbrates. Most assimilation efficiency studies have focused on chemical transfer in organisms at the bottom of the food chain; additional studies are required to examine chemical transfer at higher trophic levels.« less

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Hong Kong Univ. of Science and Technology, Kowloon (HK)
OSTI Identifier:
20006632
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 20006632
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 18; Journal Issue: 9; Other Information: PBD: Sep 1999; Journal ID: ISSN 0730-7268
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 56 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, APPLIED STUDIES; WATER POLLUTION; METALS; FOOD CHAINS; INVERTEBRATES; BIOLOGICAL ACCUMULATION; AQUATIC ORGANISMS; BIOLOGICAL AVAILABILITY; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

Citation Formats

Wang, W.X., and Fisher, N.S. Assimilation efficiencies of chemical contaminants in aquatic invertebrates: A synthesis. United States: N. p., 1999. Web. doi:10.1897/1551-5028(1999)018<2034:AEOCCI>2.3.CO;2.
Wang, W.X., & Fisher, N.S. Assimilation efficiencies of chemical contaminants in aquatic invertebrates: A synthesis. United States. doi:10.1897/1551-5028(1999)018<2034:AEOCCI>2.3.CO;2.
Wang, W.X., and Fisher, N.S. Wed . "Assimilation efficiencies of chemical contaminants in aquatic invertebrates: A synthesis". United States. doi:10.1897/1551-5028(1999)018<2034:AEOCCI>2.3.CO;2.
@article{osti_20006632,
title = {Assimilation efficiencies of chemical contaminants in aquatic invertebrates: A synthesis},
author = {Wang, W.X. and Fisher, N.S.},
abstractNote = {Assimilation efficiencies of contaminants from ingested food are critical for understanding chemical accumulation and trophic transfer in aquatic invertebrates. Assimilation efficiency is a first-order physiological parameter that can be used to systematically compare the bioavailability of different contaminants from different foods. The various techniques used to measure contaminant assimilation efficiencies are reviewed. Pulse-chase feeding techniques and the application of gamma-emitting radiotracers have been invaluable in measuring metal assimilation efficiencies in aquatic animals. Uniform radiolabeling of food is required to measure assimilation, but this can be difficult when sediments are the food source. Biological factors that influence contaminant assimilation include food quantity and quality, partitioning of contaminants in the food particles, and digestive physiology of the animals. Other factors influencing assimilation include the behavior of the chemical within the animal's gut and its associations with different geochemical fractions of food particles. Assimilation efficiency is a critical parameter to determine (and to make predictions of) bioaccumulation of chemicals from dietary exposure. Robust estimates of assimilation efficiency coupled with estimates of aqueous uptake can be used to determine the relative importance of aqueous and dietary exposures. For bioaccumulation of metals from sediments, additional studies are required to test whether metals bound to the acid-volatile sulfide fraction of sediments can be available to benthic deposit-feeding inverterbrates. Most assimilation efficiency studies have focused on chemical transfer in organisms at the bottom of the food chain; additional studies are required to examine chemical transfer at higher trophic levels.},
doi = {10.1897/1551-5028(1999)018<2034:AEOCCI>2.3.CO;2},
journal = {Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry},
issn = {0730-7268},
number = 9,
volume = 18,
place = {United States},
year = {1999},
month = {9}
}