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Title: Human lead exposure: Some recent research findings

Abstract

One of the practical problems facing industrial hygienists and safety managers in the lead industry is finding new ways to limit or reduce lead intake in order to protect workers from the deleterious effects of this metal. Exposure to lead generally takes place by inhalation of airborne particles and by ingestion. Airborne exposure is comparatively well understood and methods for the control of airborne lead have been developed and put into place in industrial facilities. Both for the general public and for workers, however, it is thought that a significant fraction of the total lead intake occurs by ingestion as opposed to inhalation. Furthermore, factors such as personal hygiene, hand washing, diet, cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, use of medications, bone injury, existing disease, and others may also have positive or negative effects on lead absorption and blood lead levels. How these variables actually operate in practice for lead-exposed workers is unfortunately not very well understood. As scientific and medical knowledge increases, progress has been made in the understanding of some of the factors affecting blood lead levels. In this article, the author summarizes the findings of a few interesting recent reports that point the way toward future progress in thismore » area.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Allis Memorial Hospital, West Allis, WI (US)
OSTI Identifier:
20006015
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 20006015
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Battery Man
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 41; Journal Issue: 9; Other Information: PBD: Sep 1999; Journal ID: ISSN 0005-6359
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING AND POLICY; 56 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, APPLIED STUDIES; LEAD; HEALTH HAZARDS; OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY; PREVENTIVE MEDICINE; CHELATING AGENTS; EDTA; ASCORBIC ACID

Citation Formats

Saryan, L.A. Human lead exposure: Some recent research findings. United States: N. p., 1999. Web.
Saryan, L.A. Human lead exposure: Some recent research findings. United States.
Saryan, L.A. Wed . "Human lead exposure: Some recent research findings". United States.
@article{osti_20006015,
title = {Human lead exposure: Some recent research findings},
author = {Saryan, L.A.},
abstractNote = {One of the practical problems facing industrial hygienists and safety managers in the lead industry is finding new ways to limit or reduce lead intake in order to protect workers from the deleterious effects of this metal. Exposure to lead generally takes place by inhalation of airborne particles and by ingestion. Airborne exposure is comparatively well understood and methods for the control of airborne lead have been developed and put into place in industrial facilities. Both for the general public and for workers, however, it is thought that a significant fraction of the total lead intake occurs by ingestion as opposed to inhalation. Furthermore, factors such as personal hygiene, hand washing, diet, cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, use of medications, bone injury, existing disease, and others may also have positive or negative effects on lead absorption and blood lead levels. How these variables actually operate in practice for lead-exposed workers is unfortunately not very well understood. As scientific and medical knowledge increases, progress has been made in the understanding of some of the factors affecting blood lead levels. In this article, the author summarizes the findings of a few interesting recent reports that point the way toward future progress in this area.},
doi = {},
journal = {Battery Man},
issn = {0005-6359},
number = 9,
volume = 41,
place = {United States},
year = {1999},
month = {9}
}