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Title: Waking the sleeping giant: Introducing new heat exchanger technology into the residential air-conditioning marketplace

Abstract

The Air Conditioning Industry has made tremendous strides in improvements to the energy efficiency and reliability of its product offerings over the past 40 years. These improvement can be attributed to enhancements of components, optimization of the energy cycle, and modernized and refined manufacturing techniques. During this same period, energy consumption for space cooling has grown significantly. In January of 1992, the minimum efficiency requirement for central air conditioning equipment was raised to 10 SEER. This efficiency level is likely to increase further under the auspices of the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act (NAECA). A new type of heat exchanger was developed for air conditioning equipment by Modine Manufacturing Company in the early 1990's. Despite significant advantages in terms of energy efficiency, dehumidification, durability, and refrigerant charge there has been little interest expressed by the air conditioning industry. A cooperative effort between Modine, various utilities, and several state energy offices has been organized to test and demonstrate the viability of this heat exchanger design throughout the nation. This paper will review the fundamentals of heat exchanger design and document this simple, yet novel technology. These experiences involving equipment retrofits have been documented with respect to the performance potential of airmore » conditioning system constructed with PF{trademark} Heat Exchangers (generically referred to as microchannel heat exchangers) from both an energy efficiency as well as a comfort perspective. The paper will also detail the current plan to introduce 16 to 24 systems into an extended field test throughout the US which commenced in the Fall of 1997.« less

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Modine Manufacturing Co., Racine, WI (US)
OSTI Identifier:
20001972
Report Number(s):
CONF-980815-
TRN: IM0001%%409
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 1998 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, Pacific Grove, CA (US), 08/23/1998--08/28/1998; Other Information: 10 volume set available for $200.00; PBD: 1998; Related Information: In: 1998 ACEEE summer study on energy efficiency in buildings: Proceedings, [3100] pages.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; AIR CONDITIONERS; HEAT EXCHANGERS; DESIGN; ENERGY EFFICIENCY; FIELD TESTS

Citation Formats

Chapp, T., Voss, M., and Stephens, C.. Waking the sleeping giant: Introducing new heat exchanger technology into the residential air-conditioning marketplace. United States: N. p., 1998. Web.
Chapp, T., Voss, M., & Stephens, C.. Waking the sleeping giant: Introducing new heat exchanger technology into the residential air-conditioning marketplace. United States.
Chapp, T., Voss, M., and Stephens, C.. 1998. "Waking the sleeping giant: Introducing new heat exchanger technology into the residential air-conditioning marketplace". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_20001972,
title = {Waking the sleeping giant: Introducing new heat exchanger technology into the residential air-conditioning marketplace},
author = {Chapp, T. and Voss, M. and Stephens, C.},
abstractNote = {The Air Conditioning Industry has made tremendous strides in improvements to the energy efficiency and reliability of its product offerings over the past 40 years. These improvement can be attributed to enhancements of components, optimization of the energy cycle, and modernized and refined manufacturing techniques. During this same period, energy consumption for space cooling has grown significantly. In January of 1992, the minimum efficiency requirement for central air conditioning equipment was raised to 10 SEER. This efficiency level is likely to increase further under the auspices of the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act (NAECA). A new type of heat exchanger was developed for air conditioning equipment by Modine Manufacturing Company in the early 1990's. Despite significant advantages in terms of energy efficiency, dehumidification, durability, and refrigerant charge there has been little interest expressed by the air conditioning industry. A cooperative effort between Modine, various utilities, and several state energy offices has been organized to test and demonstrate the viability of this heat exchanger design throughout the nation. This paper will review the fundamentals of heat exchanger design and document this simple, yet novel technology. These experiences involving equipment retrofits have been documented with respect to the performance potential of air conditioning system constructed with PF{trademark} Heat Exchangers (generically referred to as microchannel heat exchangers) from both an energy efficiency as well as a comfort perspective. The paper will also detail the current plan to introduce 16 to 24 systems into an extended field test throughout the US which commenced in the Fall of 1997.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1998,
month = 7
}

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  • Separate abstracts are prepared for 21 presentations delivered at the conference. One paper appeared previously in the appropriate DOE Energy Data Bases. (MCW)
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