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Title: An integrated assessment of the energy savings and emissions-reduction potential of combined heat and power

Abstract

Combined Heat and Power (CHP) systems, or cogeneration systems, generated electrical/mechanical and thermal energy simultaneously, recovering much of the energy normally lost in separate generation. This recovered energy can be used for heating or cooling purposes, eliminating the need for a separate boiler. Significant reductions in energy, criteria pollutants, and carbon emissions can be achieved from the improved efficiency of fuel use. Generating electricity on or near the point of use also avoids transmission and distribution losses and defers expansion of the electricity transmission grid. Several recent developments make dramatic expansion of CHP a cost-effective possibility over the next decade. First, advances in technologies such as combustion turbines, steam turbines, reciprocating engines, fuel cells. and heat-recovery equipment have decreased the cost and improved the performance of CHP systems. Second, a significant portion of the nation's boiler stock will need to be replaced in the next decade, creating an opportunity to upgrade this equipment with clean and efficient CHP systems. Third, environmental policies, including addressing concerns about greenhouse gas emissions, have created pressures to find cleaner and more efficient means of using energy. Finally, electric power market restructuring is creating new opportunities for innovations in power generation and smaller-scale distributed systemsmore » such as CHP. The integrated analysis suggests that there is enormous potential for the installation of cost-effective CHP in the industrial, district energy, and buildings sectors. The projected additional capacity by 2010 is 73 GW with corresponding energy savings of 2.6 quadrillion Btus, carbon emissions reductions of 74 million metric tons, 1.4 million tons of avoided SO{sub 2} emissions, and 0.6 million tons of avoided NO{sub x} emissions. The authors estimate that this new CHP would require cumulative capital investments of roughly $47 billion over ten years.« less

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Northeast-Midwest Inst. (US)
OSTI Identifier:
20001882
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 1999 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry, Albany, NY (US), 06/15/1999--06/18/1999; Other Information: PBD: 1999; Related Information: In: Industry and innovation in the 21st century, proceedings, 854 pages.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; 29 ENERGY PLANNING AND POLICY; COGENERATION; TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT; DUAL-PURPOSE POWER PLANTS; ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY; INDUSTRY; DISTRICT HEATING; CAPACITY; ENERGY CONSERVATION; ECONOMIC IMPACT; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS

Citation Formats

Kaarsberg, T M, Elliott, R N, and Spurr, M. An integrated assessment of the energy savings and emissions-reduction potential of combined heat and power. United States: N. p., 1999. Web.
Kaarsberg, T M, Elliott, R N, & Spurr, M. An integrated assessment of the energy savings and emissions-reduction potential of combined heat and power. United States.
Kaarsberg, T M, Elliott, R N, and Spurr, M. Thu . "An integrated assessment of the energy savings and emissions-reduction potential of combined heat and power". United States.
@article{osti_20001882,
title = {An integrated assessment of the energy savings and emissions-reduction potential of combined heat and power},
author = {Kaarsberg, T M and Elliott, R N and Spurr, M},
abstractNote = {Combined Heat and Power (CHP) systems, or cogeneration systems, generated electrical/mechanical and thermal energy simultaneously, recovering much of the energy normally lost in separate generation. This recovered energy can be used for heating or cooling purposes, eliminating the need for a separate boiler. Significant reductions in energy, criteria pollutants, and carbon emissions can be achieved from the improved efficiency of fuel use. Generating electricity on or near the point of use also avoids transmission and distribution losses and defers expansion of the electricity transmission grid. Several recent developments make dramatic expansion of CHP a cost-effective possibility over the next decade. First, advances in technologies such as combustion turbines, steam turbines, reciprocating engines, fuel cells. and heat-recovery equipment have decreased the cost and improved the performance of CHP systems. Second, a significant portion of the nation's boiler stock will need to be replaced in the next decade, creating an opportunity to upgrade this equipment with clean and efficient CHP systems. Third, environmental policies, including addressing concerns about greenhouse gas emissions, have created pressures to find cleaner and more efficient means of using energy. Finally, electric power market restructuring is creating new opportunities for innovations in power generation and smaller-scale distributed systems such as CHP. The integrated analysis suggests that there is enormous potential for the installation of cost-effective CHP in the industrial, district energy, and buildings sectors. The projected additional capacity by 2010 is 73 GW with corresponding energy savings of 2.6 quadrillion Btus, carbon emissions reductions of 74 million metric tons, 1.4 million tons of avoided SO{sub 2} emissions, and 0.6 million tons of avoided NO{sub x} emissions. The authors estimate that this new CHP would require cumulative capital investments of roughly $47 billion over ten years.},
doi = {},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/20001882}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1999},
month = {7}
}

Conference:
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