skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Reversed calcite morphologies induced by microscopic growth kinetics: Insight into biomineralization

Abstract

This experimental investigation of calcite growth quantifies relationships between solution supersaturation and the rates of step advancement. Using in situ fluid cell atomic force microscopy (AFM), the authors show that the movement of monomolecular steps comprising growth hillocks on {l{underscore}brace}10{bar 1}4{r{underscore}brace} faces during the growth of this anisotropic material is specific to crystallographic direction. By quantifying the sensitivity of step growth kinetics to supersaturation, the authors can produce spiral hillocks with unique geometries. These forms are caused by a complex dependence of step migration rates, {nu}{sub s{sup +}} and {nu}{sub s{sup {minus}}}, upon small differences in solution chemistry as they grow normal to the conventional fast ([{bar 4}41]{sub +} and [48{bar 1}]{sub +}) and slow ([{bar 4}41]{sub {minus}} and [48{bar 1}]{sub {minus}}) crystallographic directions. As solute activity, a, decreases, {nu}{sub s{sup +}} and {nu}{sub s{sup {minus}}} converge and growth hillocks express a pseudo-isotropic form. At still lower supersaturations where a approaches its equilibrium value, a{sub e}, an inversion in the rates of step advancement produces hillocks with unusual reversed geometries. Comparisons of the kinetic data with classical theoretical models suggest that the observed behavior may be due to minute impurities that impact the kinetics of growth through blocking and incorporationmore » mechanisms. These findings demonstrate the control of crystallographic structure on the local-scale kinetics of growth to stabilize the formation of unusual hillock morphologies at the near-equilibrium conditions found in natural environments.« less

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
20000931
DOE Contract Number:  
FG05-95ER14517; W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 63; Journal Issue: 17; Other Information: PBD: Sep 1999; Journal ID: ISSN 0016-7037
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
15 GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; CALCITE; CRYSTAL GROWTH; SUPERSATURATION; CRYSTAL STRUCTURE; MINERALIZATION

Citation Formats

Teng, H.H., Dove, P.M., and DeYoreo, J.J. Reversed calcite morphologies induced by microscopic growth kinetics: Insight into biomineralization. United States: N. p., 1999. Web. doi:10.1016/S0016-7037(99)00103-9.
Teng, H.H., Dove, P.M., & DeYoreo, J.J. Reversed calcite morphologies induced by microscopic growth kinetics: Insight into biomineralization. United States. doi:10.1016/S0016-7037(99)00103-9.
Teng, H.H., Dove, P.M., and DeYoreo, J.J. Wed . "Reversed calcite morphologies induced by microscopic growth kinetics: Insight into biomineralization". United States. doi:10.1016/S0016-7037(99)00103-9.
@article{osti_20000931,
title = {Reversed calcite morphologies induced by microscopic growth kinetics: Insight into biomineralization},
author = {Teng, H.H. and Dove, P.M. and DeYoreo, J.J.},
abstractNote = {This experimental investigation of calcite growth quantifies relationships between solution supersaturation and the rates of step advancement. Using in situ fluid cell atomic force microscopy (AFM), the authors show that the movement of monomolecular steps comprising growth hillocks on {l{underscore}brace}10{bar 1}4{r{underscore}brace} faces during the growth of this anisotropic material is specific to crystallographic direction. By quantifying the sensitivity of step growth kinetics to supersaturation, the authors can produce spiral hillocks with unique geometries. These forms are caused by a complex dependence of step migration rates, {nu}{sub s{sup +}} and {nu}{sub s{sup {minus}}}, upon small differences in solution chemistry as they grow normal to the conventional fast ([{bar 4}41]{sub +} and [48{bar 1}]{sub +}) and slow ([{bar 4}41]{sub {minus}} and [48{bar 1}]{sub {minus}}) crystallographic directions. As solute activity, a, decreases, {nu}{sub s{sup +}} and {nu}{sub s{sup {minus}}} converge and growth hillocks express a pseudo-isotropic form. At still lower supersaturations where a approaches its equilibrium value, a{sub e}, an inversion in the rates of step advancement produces hillocks with unusual reversed geometries. Comparisons of the kinetic data with classical theoretical models suggest that the observed behavior may be due to minute impurities that impact the kinetics of growth through blocking and incorporation mechanisms. These findings demonstrate the control of crystallographic structure on the local-scale kinetics of growth to stabilize the formation of unusual hillock morphologies at the near-equilibrium conditions found in natural environments.},
doi = {10.1016/S0016-7037(99)00103-9},
journal = {Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta},
issn = {0016-7037},
number = 17,
volume = 63,
place = {United States},
year = {1999},
month = {9}
}