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Title: Prefabricated brick wall panels: Economy or nightmare?

Abstract

Prefabricated wall systems are becoming a popular element of building construction. Prefabricated systems lend themselves to streamlining construction schedules and reducing overall construction costs. They offer the potential for increased quality due to assembly in controlled factory environments. This paper reviews basic principles and concepts for the design of waterproofing systems for prefabricated brick wall panels. Using a project case study, the author will show that failure to adhere to certain proven conventional practices can have serious adverse consequences with respect to the performance of prefabricated brick wall panels.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Simpson Gumpertz and Heger Inc., Arlington, MA (US)
OSTI Identifier:
20000684
Report Number(s):
CONF-9804139-
ISBN 0-8031-2607-7
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Water Problems in Building Exterior Walls: Evaluation, Prevention, and Repair, Atlanta, GA (US), 04/18/1998--04/19/1998; Other Information: PBD: 1999; Related Information: In: Water problems in building exterior walls: Evaluation, prevention, and repair. ASTM special technical publication 1352, by Boyd, J.M.; Scheffler, M.J. [eds.], 342 pages.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; PREFABRICATED BUILDINGS; WALLS; DESIGN; WATERPROOFING; BRICKS; PANELS; PERFORMANCE

Citation Formats

Louis, M.J. Prefabricated brick wall panels: Economy or nightmare?. United States: N. p., 1999. Web.
Louis, M.J. Prefabricated brick wall panels: Economy or nightmare?. United States.
Louis, M.J. Thu . "Prefabricated brick wall panels: Economy or nightmare?". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_20000684,
title = {Prefabricated brick wall panels: Economy or nightmare?},
author = {Louis, M.J.},
abstractNote = {Prefabricated wall systems are becoming a popular element of building construction. Prefabricated systems lend themselves to streamlining construction schedules and reducing overall construction costs. They offer the potential for increased quality due to assembly in controlled factory environments. This paper reviews basic principles and concepts for the design of waterproofing systems for prefabricated brick wall panels. Using a project case study, the author will show that failure to adhere to certain proven conventional practices can have serious adverse consequences with respect to the performance of prefabricated brick wall panels.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 1999},
month = {Thu Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 1999}
}

Conference:
Other availability
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